Reliability of Children’s Self-Reported Adherence to Recommended Asthma Treatment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151790
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reliability of Children’s Self-Reported Adherence to Recommended Asthma Treatment
Abstract:
Reliability of Children’s Self-Reported Adherence to Recommended Asthma Treatment
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Burkhart, Patricia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kentucky
Objective: Clinicians often evaluate the effectiveness of pediatric asthma treatment based on children’s self-reported adherence. However, little is known about the accuracy and reliability of these self-reports. Microprocessor technology was used in conjunction with self-report diaries to examine children’s adherence to a recommended asthma treatment regimen. Design: Self-reported and electronically recorded adherence to peak expiratory flow (PEF) monitoring was assessed as part of a randomized, controlled clinical trial testing the efficacy of an asthma self-management program. Sample: A sample of 42 children ages 7 through 11 years, with persistent asthma, participated in the 5-week study. Variables: The outcome of adherence to PEF monitoring was measured by self-reported entries on the Asthma Diary and electronic recordings downloaded from the PeakLog (Medtrac Technologies, Inc., Lakewood, CO). Methods: At home adherence to recommended twice daily (morning and evening) PEF monitoring was evaluated at Week 2 and Week 5. Findings: There was a modest correlation (rs = .33, p= .02) between self-reported and electronically recorded PEF adherence. For Week 2, the median self-reported use of the PEF monitor was 100%, whereas the median electronically recorded use was 92.9% (Wilcoxon Z = 3.4, p < .001). Self-reported adherence (Mdn = 100%) also was significantly higher than electronically monitored adherence (Mdn = 71.4%) during Week 5 (Wilcoxon Z = 4.1, p < .0001). When the actual PEF values (electronically recorded) were compared with those entered by the children in their diaries, inflated, deflated, and fabricated values were found. Accuracy of the self-reported PEF entries declined over time for the 41 children from whom electronic data were retrieved. Accurate values were reported for all days by 34.2% (n = 14) of the children during Week 2 compared with 24.4% (n = 10) during Week 5 (p = .39 McNemar’s Test). Conclusions: Electronic monitoring demonstrated much lower adherence to prescribed PEF monitoring than was reported by children in their diaries. The children also reported inaccurate PEF values. Implications: Children’s reports of their adherence to peak flow monitoring are likely to be fraught with error. Parental supervision of diary recordings, with particular attention to the accuracy of the data, is essential to ensure adherence to the therapeutic regimen by children with asthma.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReliability of Children’s Self-Reported Adherence to Recommended Asthma Treatmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151790-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Reliability of Children&rsquo;s Self-Reported Adherence to Recommended Asthma Treatment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Burkhart, Patricia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kentucky</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pvburk2@uky.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Clinicians often evaluate the effectiveness of pediatric asthma treatment based on children&rsquo;s self-reported adherence. However, little is known about the accuracy and reliability of these self-reports. Microprocessor technology was used in conjunction with self-report diaries to examine children&rsquo;s adherence to a recommended asthma treatment regimen. Design: Self-reported and electronically recorded adherence to peak expiratory flow (PEF) monitoring was assessed as part of a randomized, controlled clinical trial testing the efficacy of an asthma self-management program. Sample: A sample of 42 children ages 7 through 11 years, with persistent asthma, participated in the 5-week study. Variables: The outcome of adherence to PEF monitoring was measured by self-reported entries on the Asthma Diary and electronic recordings downloaded from the PeakLog (Medtrac Technologies, Inc., Lakewood, CO). Methods: At home adherence to recommended twice daily (morning and evening) PEF monitoring was evaluated at Week 2 and Week 5. Findings: There was a modest correlation (rs = .33, p= .02) between self-reported and electronically recorded PEF adherence. For Week 2, the median self-reported use of the PEF monitor was 100%, whereas the median electronically recorded use was 92.9% (Wilcoxon Z = 3.4, p &lt; .001). Self-reported adherence (Mdn = 100%) also was significantly higher than electronically monitored adherence (Mdn = 71.4%) during Week 5 (Wilcoxon Z = 4.1, p &lt; .0001). When the actual PEF values (electronically recorded) were compared with those entered by the children in their diaries, inflated, deflated, and fabricated values were found. Accuracy of the self-reported PEF entries declined over time for the 41 children from whom electronic data were retrieved. Accurate values were reported for all days by 34.2% (n = 14) of the children during Week 2 compared with 24.4% (n = 10) during Week 5 (p = .39 McNemar&rsquo;s Test). Conclusions: Electronic monitoring demonstrated much lower adherence to prescribed PEF monitoring than was reported by children in their diaries. The children also reported inaccurate PEF values. Implications: Children&rsquo;s reports of their adherence to peak flow monitoring are likely to be fraught with error. Parental supervision of diary recordings, with particular attention to the accuracy of the data, is essential to ensure adherence to the therapeutic regimen by children with asthma.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:13:47Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:13:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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