2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151791
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Suicidal Behavior in Abusive Men
Abstract:
Suicidal Behavior in Abusive Men
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Constantino, Rose, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pittsburgh
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: The impact of suicidal behavior on family members is devastating especially if the victim was abusive to his female intimate partner. Suicide as a complex behavior can be prevented by early recognition of the underlying factors. The purpose of this study was to characterize suicidal behavior in male abusers by creating a database from data abstracted from protective order forms filed by abused women in court. Design: A quantitative approach to an abstracted database on 61 male defendants who have abused their female intimate partner was performed. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Court Petitions and Preliminary Orders of 61 male defendants accused of abusing their female intimate partner were reviewed from the Principal Investigator’s case load of abused women seeking legal representation in their Court-Ordered PFA (Protection From Abuse). Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Concepts or variables studied together included type of abuse, suicidal behaviors (verbal threats, gestures, attempts), homicidal behaviors (verbal threats, gestures, attempts), use of alcohol, use of illicit drugs, past abuse, use of weapon and demographic variables. Methods: After coding court petitions and preliminary orders, identification was redacted. A data abstraction form (DAF) was developed for each case. Findings: Most of the subjects in the sample (N=61) were white men (n=35, 57.4 %). Twenty-five subjects (25, 41%) were African Americans and 1 (1.6 %) was Hispanic. The mean age of the male abusers was 31.7 (S.D.=9.59), and the mean age of the abused women was 30.3 (S.D.=10.2). Most of the abusers were unemployed (36, 59 %) while most of the abused women were employed (42, 68.9 %). Forty-four abusers (72.1%) used suicidal threats: “I’ll kill myself if you leave me”. One used suicidal gestures: lacerating his wrist with a knife; driving at a fast speed with children and the abused in the car without heeding road signs. Two attempted suicide: stabbing his stomach with an ice pick; taking an overdose of sleeping pills. Conclusions: Suicidal behaviors are common among abusers, where aggression turned outward is the abusive behavior and /or homicidal behavior, while aggression turned inward is the suicidal behavior. Characterizing suicidal behavior in abusive males is important. It should be a part of law enforcement’s or health care providers’ assessment. Suicidal behavior is composed of 3 distinct yet coalescing types: suicidal ideation (this data is absent here since data were obtained from court papers), suicidal threats/gestures, and suicidal attempts. Implications: Clinicians have an obligation to assess suicidal behavior of clients in any clinical setting, but more importantly in abusive relationships because abusive behaviors are known to escalate into successful suicide of the abuser. Assessment processes need to include present and past suicidal behaviors. Furthermore, clinicians have the responsibility to characterize suicidal behavior.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSuicidal Behavior in Abusive Menen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151791-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Suicidal Behavior in Abusive Men</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Constantino, Rose, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pittsburgh</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rc0100+@pitt.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The impact of suicidal behavior on family members is devastating especially if the victim was abusive to his female intimate partner. Suicide as a complex behavior can be prevented by early recognition of the underlying factors. The purpose of this study was to characterize suicidal behavior in male abusers by creating a database from data abstracted from protective order forms filed by abused women in court. Design: A quantitative approach to an abstracted database on 61 male defendants who have abused their female intimate partner was performed. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Court Petitions and Preliminary Orders of 61 male defendants accused of abusing their female intimate partner were reviewed from the Principal Investigator&rsquo;s case load of abused women seeking legal representation in their Court-Ordered PFA (Protection From Abuse). Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Concepts or variables studied together included type of abuse, suicidal behaviors (verbal threats, gestures, attempts), homicidal behaviors (verbal threats, gestures, attempts), use of alcohol, use of illicit drugs, past abuse, use of weapon and demographic variables. Methods: After coding court petitions and preliminary orders, identification was redacted. A data abstraction form (DAF) was developed for each case. Findings: Most of the subjects in the sample (N=61) were white men (n=35, 57.4 %). Twenty-five subjects (25, 41%) were African Americans and 1 (1.6 %) was Hispanic. The mean age of the male abusers was 31.7 (S.D.=9.59), and the mean age of the abused women was 30.3 (S.D.=10.2). Most of the abusers were unemployed (36, 59 %) while most of the abused women were employed (42, 68.9 %). Forty-four abusers (72.1%) used suicidal threats: &ldquo;I&rsquo;ll kill myself if you leave me&rdquo;. One used suicidal gestures: lacerating his wrist with a knife; driving at a fast speed with children and the abused in the car without heeding road signs. Two attempted suicide: stabbing his stomach with an ice pick; taking an overdose of sleeping pills. Conclusions: Suicidal behaviors are common among abusers, where aggression turned outward is the abusive behavior and /or homicidal behavior, while aggression turned inward is the suicidal behavior. Characterizing suicidal behavior in abusive males is important. It should be a part of law enforcement&rsquo;s or health care providers&rsquo; assessment. Suicidal behavior is composed of 3 distinct yet coalescing types: suicidal ideation (this data is absent here since data were obtained from court papers), suicidal threats/gestures, and suicidal attempts. Implications: Clinicians have an obligation to assess suicidal behavior of clients in any clinical setting, but more importantly in abusive relationships because abusive behaviors are known to escalate into successful suicide of the abuser. Assessment processes need to include present and past suicidal behaviors. Furthermore, clinicians have the responsibility to characterize suicidal behavior.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:13:49Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:13:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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