2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151796
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Professional Development for Nurse Leadership
Abstract:
Professional Development for Nurse Leadership
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Graham, Iain
P.I. Institution Name:Bournemouth University
Title:Professor and Academic Head
Objective: The British Labour Government brought in The NHS Plan (HMSO 2000) to radically redesign services, to put the decision makers next to the patient to give patients a clear voice in decisions being made. It could be argued that nursing has always put itself into a patient advocacy role, what was needed was a structure to allow this advocacy role to be organisationally sanctioned, hence the governments creation of the Consultant Nurse and Modern Matron roles. How these roles are translated at local level allows some discretion. This NHS Hospital Trust developed Directorate Senior Nurse (DSN) roles in advance of government thinking. The DSN role was designed to provide a nurse with real authority for decision making, at executive level. A named nurse, accessible to patients and staff, and able to give strategic and operational advice at Directorate level. (A Directorate is a group of wards, or a client group, with a common focus). Nursing has a long history of inadequately preparing staff for leadership roles (Andrews-Evans 1997, Girvin 1998). This project aimed to prepare the group of DSN's to work effectively in this newly created leadership role. Design: A series of learning sets were provided to give the group informal support and facilitated learning. Over twelve months (1999-2000) an experienced facilitator guided the group through a process of exploration using elements from Senge (1990) as a framework. The elements were systems thinking, personal mastery, mental models, shared vision and team learning. These elements were linked to the issues of leadership, strategic thinking, service planning and development, and the group used their own concrete personal and professional experiences for discussion and problem solving. The intended outcome of the learning sets was increased knowledge and understanding of systems and processes, personal and professional development and the development of leadership skills. Population: The group were all six DSN's from a District Hospital in southern England. They were interviewed over a period of two months. Concept: The DSN role was a new innovation created by members of the Executive Board of the hospital. They identified that their existing organisational structure was remote and wanted to make links between management, staff and users of the service. Methods: Professional development and leadership skills development was investigated through individual focused conversational interviews with each member of the group following consent, and analysis of the interview transcripts. The DSN's were free to take part or not as they wished, without prejudice. Findings: The results demonstrated considerable personal and professional growth within the group. The DSN's explained how they were now able to work well with systems and processes and they also found they had increased self-awareness and self-esteem that enabled them to view their lives and their roles differently. This awareness released their confidence and creativity and enabled them to work in new and creative ways, independently, with colleagues, and with teams, for service development. Concessions: There were limitations to consider. The findings reflected the views of a small number of people practising in a newly created role, so comparisions with other groups was not possible. However, the perspectives of the DSN's do give valuable insights into their development through the exercises in the learning sets. Implications: Practitioners tend to work in well practised, familiar ways. These ways reliably deliver safe effective care but these ways are limited. The limitations become ever more evident as users demand access to a differing range of services and services have to change. Personnel struggle to respond against a backdrop of limited human and fiscal resources. Change cannot happen in isolation. If one part of the system changes it impacts other parts of the system, so one group of nurses cannot work differently unless the rest of the system changes as well. This calls for corresponding work to be done with ward sisters and the DSN's peers in the management structure and nursing directorate. The service can then develop as a whole, through linking strategic planning and nursing activity. This work was about cultural change. If the DSN's are to act as change agents or agent provocateurs they also need to have a continuing support structure and ongoing organisational commitment to their personal development and continuing professional development needs.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProfessional Development for Nurse Leadershipen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151796-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Professional Development for Nurse Leadership</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Graham, Iain</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Bournemouth University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Academic Head</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">igraham@bournemouth.ac.uk</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The British Labour Government brought in The NHS Plan (HMSO 2000) to radically redesign services, to put the decision makers next to the patient to give patients a clear voice in decisions being made. It could be argued that nursing has always put itself into a patient advocacy role, what was needed was a structure to allow this advocacy role to be organisationally sanctioned, hence the governments creation of the Consultant Nurse and Modern Matron roles. How these roles are translated at local level allows some discretion. This NHS Hospital Trust developed Directorate Senior Nurse (DSN) roles in advance of government thinking. The DSN role was designed to provide a nurse with real authority for decision making, at executive level. A named nurse, accessible to patients and staff, and able to give strategic and operational advice at Directorate level. (A Directorate is a group of wards, or a client group, with a common focus). Nursing has a long history of inadequately preparing staff for leadership roles (Andrews-Evans 1997, Girvin 1998). This project aimed to prepare the group of DSN's to work effectively in this newly created leadership role. Design: A series of learning sets were provided to give the group informal support and facilitated learning. Over twelve months (1999-2000) an experienced facilitator guided the group through a process of exploration using elements from Senge (1990) as a framework. The elements were systems thinking, personal mastery, mental models, shared vision and team learning. These elements were linked to the issues of leadership, strategic thinking, service planning and development, and the group used their own concrete personal and professional experiences for discussion and problem solving. The intended outcome of the learning sets was increased knowledge and understanding of systems and processes, personal and professional development and the development of leadership skills. Population: The group were all six DSN's from a District Hospital in southern England. They were interviewed over a period of two months. Concept: The DSN role was a new innovation created by members of the Executive Board of the hospital. They identified that their existing organisational structure was remote and wanted to make links between management, staff and users of the service. Methods: Professional development and leadership skills development was investigated through individual focused conversational interviews with each member of the group following consent, and analysis of the interview transcripts. The DSN's were free to take part or not as they wished, without prejudice. Findings: The results demonstrated considerable personal and professional growth within the group. The DSN's explained how they were now able to work well with systems and processes and they also found they had increased self-awareness and self-esteem that enabled them to view their lives and their roles differently. This awareness released their confidence and creativity and enabled them to work in new and creative ways, independently, with colleagues, and with teams, for service development. Concessions: There were limitations to consider. The findings reflected the views of a small number of people practising in a newly created role, so comparisions with other groups was not possible. However, the perspectives of the DSN's do give valuable insights into their development through the exercises in the learning sets. Implications: Practitioners tend to work in well practised, familiar ways. These ways reliably deliver safe effective care but these ways are limited. The limitations become ever more evident as users demand access to a differing range of services and services have to change. Personnel struggle to respond against a backdrop of limited human and fiscal resources. Change cannot happen in isolation. If one part of the system changes it impacts other parts of the system, so one group of nurses cannot work differently unless the rest of the system changes as well. This calls for corresponding work to be done with ward sisters and the DSN's peers in the management structure and nursing directorate. The service can then develop as a whole, through linking strategic planning and nursing activity. This work was about cultural change. If the DSN's are to act as change agents or agent provocateurs they also need to have a continuing support structure and ongoing organisational commitment to their personal development and continuing professional development needs.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:13:58Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:13:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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