Post-Operative Arm Massage: A Support for Women with Lymph Node Dissection and Their Families

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151798
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Post-Operative Arm Massage: A Support for Women with Lymph Node Dissection and Their Families
Abstract:
Post-Operative Arm Massage: A Support for Women with Lymph Node Dissection and Their Families
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Forchuk, Cheryl, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Western Ontario
Title:Nurse Specialist
Objective: To examine the effects and relevance of the intervention in order to educate and share information with professionals and individuals affected with the disease in effort to improve the postoperative experience for both women and their families. Design: A randomized clinical trial. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A total of 59 women with breast cancer participated in the study with the total number in the intervention group 30(n=30) and the total in the control group 29(n=29). Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Data included demographics, pain measurements, swelling, shoulder function, and family functioning. Both groups received standard pre-operative and post-operative teaching. Methods: The study was a random clinical trial in the measurements taken. This RTC had measures taken pre-surgery, 24 hours post-surgery, 10 days post surgery, and 4 months post-surgery. Findings: Women in the intervention group used both prescribed medication and massage to cope with pain. The intervention group reported less pain during the initial post-operative period. By 3 days post-surgery there was no longer statistically significant. Similarly, the functional status involving use of the affected arm/shoulder was superior for the women in the intervention group until the final data collection period at 4 months. At that point there was no difference between groups. Family functioning scores found the intervention group more able to talk about difficulties throughout the post-surgery period. Intervention subjects reported satisfaction with the intervention, and qualitative descriptions reported that massage promoted closeness between the subjects and significant others. The women returned to normal shoulder function more quickly. This study demonstrates some encouraging results regarding massage as a therapeutic intervention for women following surgery for breast cancer. Conclusions: Post-operative massage therapy for women with lymph node dissection provided therapeutic benefits for patients and their significant other. Nurses must remain open and offer effective alternative interventions such as the one explored in this study, along with standard procedures, in order to promote optimal health for individuals. Implications: It appears to be useful for immediate post-operative pain and a more rapid return to normal arm function. Furthermore, teaching the significant other, the simple massage technique may provide a tangible helping role that traditionally had not existed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePost-Operative Arm Massage: A Support for Women with Lymph Node Dissection and Their Familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151798-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Post-Operative Arm Massage: A Support for Women with Lymph Node Dissection and Their Families</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Forchuk, Cheryl, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Western Ontario</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cforchuk@julian.uwo.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To examine the effects and relevance of the intervention in order to educate and share information with professionals and individuals affected with the disease in effort to improve the postoperative experience for both women and their families. Design: A randomized clinical trial. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A total of 59 women with breast cancer participated in the study with the total number in the intervention group 30(n=30) and the total in the control group 29(n=29). Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Data included demographics, pain measurements, swelling, shoulder function, and family functioning. Both groups received standard pre-operative and post-operative teaching. Methods: The study was a random clinical trial in the measurements taken. This RTC had measures taken pre-surgery, 24 hours post-surgery, 10 days post surgery, and 4 months post-surgery. Findings: Women in the intervention group used both prescribed medication and massage to cope with pain. The intervention group reported less pain during the initial post-operative period. By 3 days post-surgery there was no longer statistically significant. Similarly, the functional status involving use of the affected arm/shoulder was superior for the women in the intervention group until the final data collection period at 4 months. At that point there was no difference between groups. Family functioning scores found the intervention group more able to talk about difficulties throughout the post-surgery period. Intervention subjects reported satisfaction with the intervention, and qualitative descriptions reported that massage promoted closeness between the subjects and significant others. The women returned to normal shoulder function more quickly. This study demonstrates some encouraging results regarding massage as a therapeutic intervention for women following surgery for breast cancer. Conclusions: Post-operative massage therapy for women with lymph node dissection provided therapeutic benefits for patients and their significant other. Nurses must remain open and offer effective alternative interventions such as the one explored in this study, along with standard procedures, in order to promote optimal health for individuals. Implications: It appears to be useful for immediate post-operative pain and a more rapid return to normal arm function. Furthermore, teaching the significant other, the simple massage technique may provide a tangible helping role that traditionally had not existed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:14:02Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:14:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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