2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151800
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Healing Violent and Broken Communities
Abstract:
Healing Violent and Broken Communities
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Glittenberg, Jody, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona
Title:Professor
Objective: To describe the cultural factors within a violent community that control or promote alcohol and drug-related violence. Design: This is an ethnographic study that included a research team of four living in a low income-housing apartment for two years, maintaining a storefront office in a violent area for two years. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A Mexican American town with 5,669 people, 45 minutes from the Mexico-USA Border was the population and sample. The study began in 1995 with local college funding and expanded with the support of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, 1997-2001. Concept or Variables Studied: The study examined the continuum of multidimensional cultural factors that control or encourage the use of alcohol and drugs and the association between these substances and personal violence of all types. Methods: The ethnographic methods used were: participant observation, 10 focus groups, multiple event analyses, 50+ key informant interviews, 6 life histories, and a random household survey, plus quarterly meetings with a community advisory board. Findings: Multidimensional cultural factors were found rather than one simple factor leading to disconnections, stress, and poverty. Family cultural values are enabling with early induction and normalizing of alcohol/drug abuse with associated violence. A triad network of gangs, prostitutes, and drug dealers keep the illegal economy of drug trafficking alive. The high cost of crime and its prosecution continue to paralyze the island-like town surrounded by a large urban center. Maintaining the idealized Mexican culture conflicts with the need to acculturate rapidly illegal immigrants from Mexico. Monolingual women are especially susceptible to violence and poverty. Children are also the victims of poor language skills, unstable families, and unrootedness. The hierarchical, male-dominated family and church system maintains control. The influx of over $7 million federal dollars is making astonishing changes in the physical appearance of the town, but without inclusion of the actual citizens of the town, changes will be superficial and short-lived. Major crime rates have dropped by one-half in the last 3 years, due to a new police chief. Trust is beginning, but the townspeople are still fearful. Conclusions: Solutions for healing broken communities must be multidimensional, and understanding the international relationships between the US and Mexico. Healing must begin in the family setting and focusing on empowering women/mothers through education and economic opportunity. Implications: Sociopolitical policies must be macrolevel in order to influence microlevel action. Relations between Mexico & the US must focus on reducing economic disparities; drugs must be deprofiticized. Nursing has a major role in bringing these issues to awareness and resolution.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealing Violent and Broken Communitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151800-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Healing Violent and Broken Communities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Glittenberg, Jody, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jglitten@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To describe the cultural factors within a violent community that control or promote alcohol and drug-related violence. Design: This is an ethnographic study that included a research team of four living in a low income-housing apartment for two years, maintaining a storefront office in a violent area for two years. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A Mexican American town with 5,669 people, 45 minutes from the Mexico-USA Border was the population and sample. The study began in 1995 with local college funding and expanded with the support of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, 1997-2001. Concept or Variables Studied: The study examined the continuum of multidimensional cultural factors that control or encourage the use of alcohol and drugs and the association between these substances and personal violence of all types. Methods: The ethnographic methods used were: participant observation, 10 focus groups, multiple event analyses, 50+ key informant interviews, 6 life histories, and a random household survey, plus quarterly meetings with a community advisory board. Findings: Multidimensional cultural factors were found rather than one simple factor leading to disconnections, stress, and poverty. Family cultural values are enabling with early induction and normalizing of alcohol/drug abuse with associated violence. A triad network of gangs, prostitutes, and drug dealers keep the illegal economy of drug trafficking alive. The high cost of crime and its prosecution continue to paralyze the island-like town surrounded by a large urban center. Maintaining the idealized Mexican culture conflicts with the need to acculturate rapidly illegal immigrants from Mexico. Monolingual women are especially susceptible to violence and poverty. Children are also the victims of poor language skills, unstable families, and unrootedness. The hierarchical, male-dominated family and church system maintains control. The influx of over $7 million federal dollars is making astonishing changes in the physical appearance of the town, but without inclusion of the actual citizens of the town, changes will be superficial and short-lived. Major crime rates have dropped by one-half in the last 3 years, due to a new police chief. Trust is beginning, but the townspeople are still fearful. Conclusions: Solutions for healing broken communities must be multidimensional, and understanding the international relationships between the US and Mexico. Healing must begin in the family setting and focusing on empowering women/mothers through education and economic opportunity. Implications: Sociopolitical policies must be macrolevel in order to influence microlevel action. Relations between Mexico &amp; the US must focus on reducing economic disparities; drugs must be deprofiticized. Nursing has a major role in bringing these issues to awareness and resolution.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:14:06Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:14:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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