2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151801
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hormone Replacement and Women with Disabilities
Abstract:
Hormone Replacement and Women with Disabilities
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Gordon, Dorothy, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas at Austin
Title:
Objective: Explore factors associated with decision making to take Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) among women with physical disabilities and identify ways to facilitate their decision-making. Design: Cross-sectional correlational design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: National sample of 167 women with disabilities between the ages of 38 and 78 and living in the community. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Integration of Fishbein and Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior and Becker's Health Belief Model provided the framework to examine factors that influence women with physical disabilities to take HRT. Variables included: Health beliefs, Affective Evaluation, Behavioral Control, Normative Beliefs and Motivation to Comply, Knowledge, and Decisional Conflict concerning HRT. Methods: Fliers advertising the project and eligibility requirements were mailed and/or distributed to individuals and programs that serve people with disabilities. Those returning postcards indicating willingness to participate and who met study criteria received the questionnaire packet. Questionnaires included in the packet were: background information form, beliefs about HRT, and O'Connor's knowledge and decision conflict questionnaires. Two open-ended questions were included related to resources and support, and, comments about the subject's menopausal experience. Descriptive statistics currently are being analyzed and prepared for subsequent analysis of research questions. Findings: Respondents were from 41 states and Puerto Rico. The typical respondent was a 52-year-old Anglo woman with a college degree but currently unemployed due to her disability. Twenty-five per cent of the sample had multiple sclerosis, 18% had joint/connective tissue disorders, 13% were post polio and 10% had spinal cord injury. While about half of the menopausal women were taking HRT, a major finding of this study is the large number of women who don't know how HRT will affect them. This is of particular importance since women with disabilities face special issues (such as risk of thrombosis) related to menopause and HRT use. The predominant theme in response to the open-ended question about needed resources and supports during menopause was experts who know disability and HRT. Almost as many comments referred to advice from physicians as a major information source. When asked for other comments about their menopausal experiences, women wrote about the problems they experienced, and what made it especially difficult for women with disabilities. Many women also indicated that taking HRT was worth the risk. Conclusions: Conclusions and Implications of the study will be reported following the completed analysis of findings. Implications: See Conclusions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHormone Replacement and Women with Disabilitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151801-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hormone Replacement and Women with Disabilities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gordon, Dorothy, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas at Austin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dgordon@mail.nur.utexas.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Explore factors associated with decision making to take Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) among women with physical disabilities and identify ways to facilitate their decision-making. Design: Cross-sectional correlational design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: National sample of 167 women with disabilities between the ages of 38 and 78 and living in the community. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Integration of Fishbein and Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior and Becker's Health Belief Model provided the framework to examine factors that influence women with physical disabilities to take HRT. Variables included: Health beliefs, Affective Evaluation, Behavioral Control, Normative Beliefs and Motivation to Comply, Knowledge, and Decisional Conflict concerning HRT. Methods: Fliers advertising the project and eligibility requirements were mailed and/or distributed to individuals and programs that serve people with disabilities. Those returning postcards indicating willingness to participate and who met study criteria received the questionnaire packet. Questionnaires included in the packet were: background information form, beliefs about HRT, and O'Connor's knowledge and decision conflict questionnaires. Two open-ended questions were included related to resources and support, and, comments about the subject's menopausal experience. Descriptive statistics currently are being analyzed and prepared for subsequent analysis of research questions. Findings: Respondents were from 41 states and Puerto Rico. The typical respondent was a 52-year-old Anglo woman with a college degree but currently unemployed due to her disability. Twenty-five per cent of the sample had multiple sclerosis, 18% had joint/connective tissue disorders, 13% were post polio and 10% had spinal cord injury. While about half of the menopausal women were taking HRT, a major finding of this study is the large number of women who don't know how HRT will affect them. This is of particular importance since women with disabilities face special issues (such as risk of thrombosis) related to menopause and HRT use. The predominant theme in response to the open-ended question about needed resources and supports during menopause was experts who know disability and HRT. Almost as many comments referred to advice from physicians as a major information source. When asked for other comments about their menopausal experiences, women wrote about the problems they experienced, and what made it especially difficult for women with disabilities. Many women also indicated that taking HRT was worth the risk. Conclusions: Conclusions and Implications of the study will be reported following the completed analysis of findings. Implications: See Conclusions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:14:08Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:14:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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