A Comparison of seropositive caregivers to seronegative caregivers: Stress, coping, and social support

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151802
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparison of seropositive caregivers to seronegative caregivers: Stress, coping, and social support
Abstract:
A Comparison of seropositive caregivers to seronegative caregivers: Stress, coping, and social support
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Hansell, Phyllis, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Hall University
Title:Chair Graduate Nursing Department
Objectives: (1) To assess caregivers stress, caregiver coping and caregiver's social support, (2) To compare caregiver stress, caregiver coping and caregiver social support between HIV infected caregivers and non-HIV infected caregivers. Methods: A comparative survey design was used to implement the study. Subjects were 120 primary caregivers of HIV infected children. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and MANOVA. Caregiver problems were determined using content analysis. Measures: (1) F-Copes (Family Crisis Oriented Personal Scales), (2) The Derogatis Stress Profile, (3) The Tilden Interpersonal Inventory. Results: Data were analyzed using MANOVA to test for significant differences between the 2 study groups. Significant differences were found between the 2 groups on stress and coping levels. There were no significant differences found between the 2 groups on social support. Conclusions: The results of the study indicate that HIV infected caregivers (biological parents) have significantly greater stress and use fewer coping strategies. These results suggest that HIV caregivers need interventions aimed at reducing stress and facilitating coping. These data are part of a longitudinal study that tested the effect of a social support boosting intervention upon caregiver stress, coping and social support.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparison of seropositive caregivers to seronegative caregivers: Stress, coping, and social supporten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151802-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Comparison of seropositive caregivers to seronegative caregivers: Stress, coping, and social support</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hansell, Phyllis, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Hall University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Chair Graduate Nursing Department</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Hanselph@shu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: (1) To assess caregivers stress, caregiver coping and caregiver's social support, (2) To compare caregiver stress, caregiver coping and caregiver social support between HIV infected caregivers and non-HIV infected caregivers. Methods: A comparative survey design was used to implement the study. Subjects were 120 primary caregivers of HIV infected children. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and MANOVA. Caregiver problems were determined using content analysis. Measures: (1) F-Copes (Family Crisis Oriented Personal Scales), (2) The Derogatis Stress Profile, (3) The Tilden Interpersonal Inventory. Results: Data were analyzed using MANOVA to test for significant differences between the 2 study groups. Significant differences were found between the 2 groups on stress and coping levels. There were no significant differences found between the 2 groups on social support. Conclusions: The results of the study indicate that HIV infected caregivers (biological parents) have significantly greater stress and use fewer coping strategies. These results suggest that HIV caregivers need interventions aimed at reducing stress and facilitating coping. These data are part of a longitudinal study that tested the effect of a social support boosting intervention upon caregiver stress, coping and social support.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:14:11Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:14:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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