Telehealth Application for A Child Abuse/Neglect Prevention Program: A Feasibility Project

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151806
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Telehealth Application for A Child Abuse/Neglect Prevention Program: A Feasibility Project
Abstract:
Telehealth Application for A Child Abuse/Neglect Prevention Program: A Feasibility Project
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Inouye, Jillian, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hawaii
Title:Associate Professor
OBJECTIVE: This feasibility project was instituted to explore the acceptance and reliability of integrating inexpensive Plain Old Telephone Service (POTS) video technology into an existing program. The specific aims were to, determine the technical feasibility of implementing two-way video technology into a community health nursing child abuse prevention program; evaluate clients’ and nurses’ satisfaction with the technology; and evaluate the ability of this technology to improve program efficiency. DESIGN: A comparative descriptive design using correlations and content analysis was utilized. SAMPLE, SETTING, YEARS: The sample consisted of 19 military families residing in the state of Hawaii and participating the military’s Joint New Parent Support Program (JNPSP). CONCEPT/VARIABLES STUDIED OR INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME VARIABLES: Because child abuse and neglect has effects on families and communities, early intervention efforts are crucial for health promotion and maintenance. The efficacy of home visitation programs in reducing child abuse and neglect has been well documented. However, dwindling resources, length of time commuting, patient no-show, lack of flexibility scheduling visits, and safety issues have limiting effects on the efficacy of home visitations. To date, no research documenting utilization of two-way video technology for a prenatal high-risk population has been identified. To measure satisfaction outcomes, two satisfaction surveys were utilized as well as a productivity form. METHODS: Mothers identified as high risk for the potential for child maltreatment enrolled in the JNPSP were invited to participate in this study. They were provided the standard program intervention program augmented with telehealth visitations. The equipment included 20 ViaTV video cameras and speakerphones in the patients’ homes as well as 5 each in the community health nurses’ office and homes. Home, clinic, phone, and ward visits continued as needed. Pre and post measures were collected at an average of 13.89 weeks duration. FINDINGS: Results from the nurses’ survey indicated the nurses were not very satisfied with this technology because of the inadequacy of the pictures, lack of comfort communicating, and feelings that patients did not understand their health education. Data from the patients also indicated that they had some difficulty talking via video, that the equipment was not easy to use, was not reliable, and the picture was inadequate. Open-ended questions revealed that satisfaction was related to flexibility of visits, perceptions by the nurses that relationships with their patients improved, safety, less wasted time, and that difficulties were related to installation and maintenance of the equipment. Patients were more positive and less critical than the nurses. They liked the access to their nurses and felt less isolated. Face to face time was increased as well as travel time, mileage, and home visitations. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified difficulties with POTS technology was mainly due to technical difficulties and the interference it had with home life. It further highlighted the importance of user-friendly teletechnology in enhancing nurse-patient and nurse-family interactions. IMPLICATIONS: Home visitation/prevention programs can utilize technology in providing care to a greater geographic area. It provides greater flexibility and access as well as addresses safety issues.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTelehealth Application for A Child Abuse/Neglect Prevention Program: A Feasibility Projecten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151806-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Telehealth Application for A Child Abuse/Neglect Prevention Program: A Feasibility Project</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Inouye, Jillian, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hawaii</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jinouye@hawaii.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">OBJECTIVE: This feasibility project was instituted to explore the acceptance and reliability of integrating inexpensive Plain Old Telephone Service (POTS) video technology into an existing program. The specific aims were to, determine the technical feasibility of implementing two-way video technology into a community health nursing child abuse prevention program; evaluate clients&rsquo; and nurses&rsquo; satisfaction with the technology; and evaluate the ability of this technology to improve program efficiency. DESIGN: A comparative descriptive design using correlations and content analysis was utilized. SAMPLE, SETTING, YEARS: The sample consisted of 19 military families residing in the state of Hawaii and participating the military&rsquo;s Joint New Parent Support Program (JNPSP). CONCEPT/VARIABLES STUDIED OR INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME VARIABLES: Because child abuse and neglect has effects on families and communities, early intervention efforts are crucial for health promotion and maintenance. The efficacy of home visitation programs in reducing child abuse and neglect has been well documented. However, dwindling resources, length of time commuting, patient no-show, lack of flexibility scheduling visits, and safety issues have limiting effects on the efficacy of home visitations. To date, no research documenting utilization of two-way video technology for a prenatal high-risk population has been identified. To measure satisfaction outcomes, two satisfaction surveys were utilized as well as a productivity form. METHODS: Mothers identified as high risk for the potential for child maltreatment enrolled in the JNPSP were invited to participate in this study. They were provided the standard program intervention program augmented with telehealth visitations. The equipment included 20 ViaTV video cameras and speakerphones in the patients&rsquo; homes as well as 5 each in the community health nurses&rsquo; office and homes. Home, clinic, phone, and ward visits continued as needed. Pre and post measures were collected at an average of 13.89 weeks duration. FINDINGS: Results from the nurses&rsquo; survey indicated the nurses were not very satisfied with this technology because of the inadequacy of the pictures, lack of comfort communicating, and feelings that patients did not understand their health education. Data from the patients also indicated that they had some difficulty talking via video, that the equipment was not easy to use, was not reliable, and the picture was inadequate. Open-ended questions revealed that satisfaction was related to flexibility of visits, perceptions by the nurses that relationships with their patients improved, safety, less wasted time, and that difficulties were related to installation and maintenance of the equipment. Patients were more positive and less critical than the nurses. They liked the access to their nurses and felt less isolated. Face to face time was increased as well as travel time, mileage, and home visitations. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified difficulties with POTS technology was mainly due to technical difficulties and the interference it had with home life. It further highlighted the importance of user-friendly teletechnology in enhancing nurse-patient and nurse-family interactions. IMPLICATIONS: Home visitation/prevention programs can utilize technology in providing care to a greater geographic area. It provides greater flexibility and access as well as addresses safety issues.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:14:19Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:14:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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