2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151807
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring Outcomes of Surgery: Findings and Implications
Abstract:
Measuring Outcomes of Surgery: Findings and Implications
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Jones, Katherine
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Objective: To measure generic and condition-specific outcomes experienced by patients undergoing three selected surgical procedures. Design: A longitudinal, descriptive study using patient surveys and medical record reviews. Population/Setting: Between 1994 and 1999, six hundred twenty-seven patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair (250), cholecystectomy (172), and parathyroidectomy (205) in one academic medical center in the U.S. Midwest were enrolled in the study during their preoperative clinic visit by a graduate nurse research assistant. The study had IRB approval. Variables: Patient baseline data included socio-economic characteristics, comorbid conditions, health status and well-being as measured by the Medical Outcomes Study Short-form 36, expectations, and condition-specific symptoms. Outcome measures included complications, symptom relief, health status and well-being improvements, met expectations, preparation for surgery and discharge, perceived quality of care, and return to work. Operative details were abstracted from the medical record, and included type of procedure, pain management, and complications. Methods: Surveys were completed preoperatively in person, and again at two and six months postoperatively by mail. Telephone contacts were made for missing or incomplete returns. Chart reviews were done at two months after surgery, to allow time for transcription of operative information. Data were entered into an ACCESS database, and analyzed using SAS for the PC. Findings: Return rates exceeded 70% at two and six months. The SF-36 was shown to be a sensitive indicator of recovery after surgery, particularly the role limitation, bodily pain, and vitality scales. Significant, but not complete, symptom relief was achieved by most patients after surgery. Few complications occurred, but opportunities for care process improvements were identified by many patients. Substantial variation in time to return to work after surgery was observed, which was only partially explained by type of occupation. Gender differences were apparent in the detection and management of primary hyperparathyroidism as well. Conclusions: Useful information can be obtained by the systematic collection of data directly from patients. This information can be used in quality improvement initiatives and in the development of innovative care approaches. Implications: Patient-based assessments of outcomes of care should be part of the routine care delivery process. Chart reviews and provider perceptions of patient outcomes are insufficient for assessing the quality of care being delivered.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring Outcomes of Surgery: Findings and Implicationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151807-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measuring Outcomes of Surgery: Findings and Implications</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jones, Katherine</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Health Sciences Center</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">katherine.jones@uchsc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To measure generic and condition-specific outcomes experienced by patients undergoing three selected surgical procedures. Design: A longitudinal, descriptive study using patient surveys and medical record reviews. Population/Setting: Between 1994 and 1999, six hundred twenty-seven patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair (250), cholecystectomy (172), and parathyroidectomy (205) in one academic medical center in the U.S. Midwest were enrolled in the study during their preoperative clinic visit by a graduate nurse research assistant. The study had IRB approval. Variables: Patient baseline data included socio-economic characteristics, comorbid conditions, health status and well-being as measured by the Medical Outcomes Study Short-form 36, expectations, and condition-specific symptoms. Outcome measures included complications, symptom relief, health status and well-being improvements, met expectations, preparation for surgery and discharge, perceived quality of care, and return to work. Operative details were abstracted from the medical record, and included type of procedure, pain management, and complications. Methods: Surveys were completed preoperatively in person, and again at two and six months postoperatively by mail. Telephone contacts were made for missing or incomplete returns. Chart reviews were done at two months after surgery, to allow time for transcription of operative information. Data were entered into an ACCESS database, and analyzed using SAS for the PC. Findings: Return rates exceeded 70% at two and six months. The SF-36 was shown to be a sensitive indicator of recovery after surgery, particularly the role limitation, bodily pain, and vitality scales. Significant, but not complete, symptom relief was achieved by most patients after surgery. Few complications occurred, but opportunities for care process improvements were identified by many patients. Substantial variation in time to return to work after surgery was observed, which was only partially explained by type of occupation. Gender differences were apparent in the detection and management of primary hyperparathyroidism as well. Conclusions: Useful information can be obtained by the systematic collection of data directly from patients. This information can be used in quality improvement initiatives and in the development of innovative care approaches. Implications: Patient-based assessments of outcomes of care should be part of the routine care delivery process. Chart reviews and provider perceptions of patient outcomes are insufficient for assessing the quality of care being delivered.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:14:21Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:14:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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