Pain Management as an Outcome Measure of Patient Satisfaction in a Critical Care Unit

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151816
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pain Management as an Outcome Measure of Patient Satisfaction in a Critical Care Unit
Abstract:
Pain Management as an Outcome Measure of Patient Satisfaction in a Critical Care Unit
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Andrew, Sharon, PhD, RN, RM, BAppSc, MSc(Hons)
P.I. Institution Name:University of Western Sydney
Title:Dr.
Co-Authors:Yenna Salamonson, PhD, RN, BSc, CCUCert, GDNEd, MA; Patricia Davidson, RN, BA, MEd, PhD; Bronwyn Everett, RN, BAppSc(Nurs), MSc
[Evidence-based Practice Session Presentation] Patient satisfaction is frequently used as an outcome measure when assessing the quality of nursing or medical care. Although there are many patient satisfaction instruments available globally, these scales often have a ceiling effect as patients consistently tend to score their care in the mid-to-high range for most items on a scale. Consequently, if is difficult for researchers to use the data for comparative studies. In our pre-post test study, in addition to patient satisfaction, we collected demographic and clinical information, and surveyed patients' about their satisfaction with their pain management. The data was collected before and after the implementation a change to the nursing care delivery in a neurosurgical critical care unit. The change included a different nurse skill-mix, physical environment, and organisation of nursing care delivery. Data was collected from N = 49 patients pre, and N = 99 post the changes. There were no statistically significant changes in patients' demographic and clinical characteristics post the changes with the average age of patients 53.94 years (SD = 18) and average length of stay 3.55 days (SD = 3.03). As expected, patients were highly satisfied with their nursing care pre and post the change and also indicated that they were highly satisfied (10) with nurses' and doctors' management of their pain (0= low; 10 high; p = 0.864). However, when asked specific questions about their pain management, patients indicated that they had to wait longer for additional pain medication if they requested it (p = 0.001) and were less likely to be given an anti-emetic in the post phase (p = 0.002). This study underscores the importance of including specific items related to pain management to improve the sensitivity of assessing patient satisfaction.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePain Management as an Outcome Measure of Patient Satisfaction in a Critical Care Uniten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151816-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pain Management as an Outcome Measure of Patient Satisfaction in a Critical Care Unit</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Andrew, Sharon, PhD, RN, RM, BAppSc, MSc(Hons)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Western Sydney</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dr.</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">s.andrew@uws.edu.au</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Yenna Salamonson, PhD, RN, BSc, CCUCert, GDNEd, MA; Patricia Davidson, RN, BA, MEd, PhD; Bronwyn Everett, RN, BAppSc(Nurs), MSc</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Practice Session Presentation] Patient satisfaction is frequently used as an outcome measure when assessing the quality of nursing or medical care. Although there are many patient satisfaction instruments available globally, these scales often have a ceiling effect as patients consistently tend to score their care in the mid-to-high range for most items on&nbsp;a scale. Consequently, if is difficult for researchers to use the data for comparative studies. In our pre-post test study, in addition to patient satisfaction, we collected demographic and clinical information, and surveyed patients' about their satisfaction with their pain management. The data was collected before and after the implementation a change to the nursing care delivery in a neurosurgical critical care unit. The change included a different nurse skill-mix, physical environment, and organisation of nursing care delivery. Data was collected from N = 49 patients pre, and N = 99 post the changes. There were no statistically significant changes in patients' demographic and clinical characteristics post the changes with the average age of patients 53.94 years (SD = 18) and average length of stay 3.55 days (SD = 3.03). As expected, patients were highly satisfied with their nursing care pre and post the change and also indicated that they were highly satisfied (10) with nurses' and doctors' management of their pain (0= low; 10 high; p = 0.864). However, when asked specific questions about their pain management, patients indicated that they had to wait longer for additional pain medication if they requested it (p = 0.001) and were less likely to be given an anti-emetic in the post phase (p = 0.002). This study underscores the importance of including specific items related to pain management to improve the sensitivity of assessing patient satisfaction.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:14:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:14:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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