Global Healthcare Trends for Adolescents: Evaluation Outcomes of the Newark New Jersey Best Friends/Best Men Adolescent Family Life Intervention Program and Implications for Nursing Practice, Education and Research

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151818
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Global Healthcare Trends for Adolescents: Evaluation Outcomes of the Newark New Jersey Best Friends/Best Men Adolescent Family Life Intervention Program and Implications for Nursing Practice, Education and Research
Abstract:
Global Healthcare Trends for Adolescents: Evaluation Outcomes of the Newark New Jersey Best Friends/Best Men Adolescent Family Life Intervention Program and Implications for Nursing Practice, Education and Research
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Sternas, Kathleen A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Hall University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Mary Ann Scharf, EdD; Janet Summerly, BSN, MSN, RN; RoseMarie Peterkin, MAT
[Research Presentation] Purpose: Global trends indicate there are high rates of risky behaviors among adolescents which affect health. Newark has high rates of adolescent drug/alcohol use, smoking, STD's/HIV/AIDS, and teen pregnancy. This presentation: describes outcomes of the Best Friends/Best Men Adolescent Family Life intervention program which promotes abstinence from smoking, drinking, drugs, sex in teenagers; compares outcomes of intervention and comparison participants (no intervention).  Bandura's Social Learning/Piaget's Cognitive Development theories guided the intervention which focused on discussions, mentoring, health/fitness classes, cultural events, community service, recognition. Methods: Pretest post-test design. Four intervention schools (N=269,183 girls/86 boys) and five comparison schools (N=220,123 girls/97 boys) participated. Intervention participants were randomly selected. Comparison participants were a convenience sample. Comparison and intervention schools were matched on demographic variables. Instruments: AFL Core Baseline/Follow-up and Demographic Questionnaires.  Pearson Chi Square and Mann Whitney U statistical tests and .05 level of significance were used. Results: Significantly more intervention than comparison participants reported: saying no to wrong activities (p=.005); more confidence (p=.009)/ bright future (p=.009); important to remain abstinent (p<.001)and future spouse to remain abstinent until marriage (p<.001); abstinence is way to avoid pregnancy/STDs/related health problems(p=.002). Significantly more comparison than intervention participants reported: friends that drink (p=.009); tried marijuana/other drugs(p=.026). Comparison girls were higher than intervention girls on: friends tried marijuana/drugs (p=.027); little control(p=.008). More comparison than intervention boys reported: friends who drink (p=.05); not talking with parents/guardians about saying no to alcohol/drugs/sex (p=.006). Intervention participants were significantly higher at post-test than pretest on: saying no to wrong activities (p=.001); staying away from trouble (p=.003); self-confidence (p<.001); no sex until marriage (p=.001).Conclusion: Intervention participants demonstrated positive outcomes including fewer risky behaviors like drinking/drug use and more abstinence attitudes/behaviors than comparison participants. Findings have implications for nursing practice, education and research and development of intervention programs which aim to reduce risky behaviors/promote abstinence attitudes/behaviors in adolescents.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGlobal Healthcare Trends for Adolescents: Evaluation Outcomes of the Newark New Jersey Best Friends/Best Men Adolescent Family Life Intervention Program and Implications for Nursing Practice, Education and Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151818-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Global Healthcare Trends for Adolescents: Evaluation Outcomes of the Newark New Jersey Best Friends/Best Men Adolescent Family Life Intervention Program and Implications for Nursing Practice, Education and Research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sternas, Kathleen A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Hall University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sternaka@shu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Ann Scharf, EdD; Janet Summerly, BSN, MSN, RN; RoseMarie Peterkin, MAT</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose: Global trends indicate there are high rates of risky behaviors among adolescents which affect health. Newark has high rates of adolescent drug/alcohol use, smoking, STD's/HIV/AIDS, and teen pregnancy. This presentation: describes outcomes of the Best Friends/Best Men Adolescent Family Life intervention program which promotes abstinence from smoking, drinking, drugs, sex in teenagers; compares outcomes of intervention and comparison participants (no intervention).&nbsp; Bandura's Social Learning/Piaget's Cognitive Development theories guided the intervention which focused on discussions, mentoring, health/fitness classes, cultural events, community service, recognition. Methods: Pretest post-test design. Four intervention schools (N=269,183 girls/86 boys) and five comparison schools (N=220,123 girls/97 boys) participated. Intervention participants were randomly selected. Comparison participants were a convenience sample. Comparison and intervention schools were matched on demographic variables. Instruments: AFL Core Baseline/Follow-up and Demographic Questionnaires.&nbsp; Pearson Chi Square and Mann Whitney U statistical tests and .05 level of significance were used. Results: Significantly more intervention than comparison participants reported: saying no to wrong activities (p=.005); more confidence (p=.009)/ bright future (p=.009); important to remain abstinent (p&lt;.001)and future spouse to remain abstinent until marriage (p&lt;.001); abstinence is way to avoid pregnancy/STDs/related health problems(p=.002). Significantly more comparison than intervention participants reported: friends that drink (p=.009); tried marijuana/other drugs(p=.026). Comparison girls were higher than intervention girls on: friends tried marijuana/drugs (p=.027); little control(p=.008). More comparison than intervention boys reported: friends who drink (p=.05); not talking with parents/guardians about saying no to alcohol/drugs/sex (p=.006). Intervention participants were significantly higher at post-test than pretest on: saying no to wrong activities (p=.001); staying away from trouble (p=.003); self-confidence (p&lt;.001); no sex until marriage (p=.001).Conclusion: Intervention participants demonstrated positive outcomes including fewer risky behaviors like drinking/drug use and more abstinence attitudes/behaviors than comparison participants. Findings have implications for nursing practice, education and research and development of intervention programs which aim to reduce risky behaviors/promote abstinence attitudes/behaviors in adolescents.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:14:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:14:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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