Identification of Components That Comprise a Leadership Education Model for Nursing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151820
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Identification of Components That Comprise a Leadership Education Model for Nursing
Abstract:
Identification of Components That Comprise a Leadership Education Model for Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Lemire, Judith
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University-Fort Wayne
Objective: Identify the leadership knowledge, skills and attributes essential to effective nursing leadership that will provide the foundation for the development of a leadership education model as a progressive and integrated learning experience for the RN to BSN and graduate nursing student. Determine if the leadership knowledge, skill, and attribute constructs identified by the task force as important to leadership development would be perceived as important to the sample population. Design: Descriptive survey. Population Sample: A total of 521 respondents. Nurse administrators 270 (51.8%), nursing faculty 87 (16.7%), RN to BSN and graduate nursing students 98 (18.8%), and other 66 (12.7%). Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Thirty-one leadership constructs identified from a review of the literature consisted of 9 leadership principle and development constructs, 9 basic leadership knowledge and skill constructs, and 13 advanced knowledge and skill constructs. Methods: A descriptive survey mailed to 1371 of the target population with a 38% return rate. Statistical analysis: Descriptive analysis, internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient), one way analysis of variance (Scheffe’s test), and a qualitative analysis of comments. Findings: Internal consistency, Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the questionnaire was strong at .8840. The descriptive analysis showed a high level of agreement on the importance of the 31 questionnaire items. The one-way analysis of variance showed no significant difference between groups. Scheffe’s post hoc analysis showed a difference between the student and nurse administrator groups on the subscales of critical thinker and mentor. The nurse administrator group rated the constructs of critical thinker and mentor significantly more important then the student group rated them. Even though the questionnaire asked for comments on leadership knowledge, skills, and behaviors...” many comments addressed personal characteristics. Many comments also addressed management rather than leadership. Conclusions: Significant validation of the importance of the 31 leadership constructs for leadership development that would provide the foundation for the development of a leadership education model. The comments indicate a high level of uncertainty as to what leadership really is. Implications: The confusion over what leadership really is indicates a need for leadership education and development within the profession. A consensus on the leadership knowledge, skills, and attributes will provide the framework for a data based leadership education model to be progressively integrated into the RN to BSN and graduate nursing curricula.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIdentification of Components That Comprise a Leadership Education Model for Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151820-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Identification of Components That Comprise a Leadership Education Model for Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lemire, Judith</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University-Fort Wayne</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lemirej@ipfw.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Identify the leadership knowledge, skills and attributes essential to effective nursing leadership that will provide the foundation for the development of a leadership education model as a progressive and integrated learning experience for the RN to BSN and graduate nursing student. Determine if the leadership knowledge, skill, and attribute constructs identified by the task force as important to leadership development would be perceived as important to the sample population. Design: Descriptive survey. Population Sample: A total of 521 respondents. Nurse administrators 270 (51.8%), nursing faculty 87 (16.7%), RN to BSN and graduate nursing students 98 (18.8%), and other 66 (12.7%). Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Thirty-one leadership constructs identified from a review of the literature consisted of 9 leadership principle and development constructs, 9 basic leadership knowledge and skill constructs, and 13 advanced knowledge and skill constructs. Methods: A descriptive survey mailed to 1371 of the target population with a 38% return rate. Statistical analysis: Descriptive analysis, internal consistency (Cronbach&rsquo;s alpha coefficient), one way analysis of variance (Scheffe&rsquo;s test), and a qualitative analysis of comments. Findings: Internal consistency, Cronbach&rsquo;s alpha coefficient for the questionnaire was strong at .8840. The descriptive analysis showed a high level of agreement on the importance of the 31 questionnaire items. The one-way analysis of variance showed no significant difference between groups. Scheffe&rsquo;s post hoc analysis showed a difference between the student and nurse administrator groups on the subscales of critical thinker and mentor. The nurse administrator group rated the constructs of critical thinker and mentor significantly more important then the student group rated them. Even though the questionnaire asked for comments on leadership knowledge, skills, and behaviors...&rdquo; many comments addressed personal characteristics. Many comments also addressed management rather than leadership. Conclusions: Significant validation of the importance of the 31 leadership constructs for leadership development that would provide the foundation for the development of a leadership education model. The comments indicate a high level of uncertainty as to what leadership really is. Implications: The confusion over what leadership really is indicates a need for leadership education and development within the profession. A consensus on the leadership knowledge, skills, and attributes will provide the framework for a data based leadership education model to be progressively integrated into the RN to BSN and graduate nursing curricula.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:14:46Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:14:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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