Impact of Pre-operative Sleep on Physical Function and Mental Health After Cardiac Surgery: Preliminary Data

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151824
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Pre-operative Sleep on Physical Function and Mental Health After Cardiac Surgery: Preliminary Data
Abstract:
Impact of Pre-operative Sleep on Physical Function and Mental Health After Cardiac Surgery: Preliminary Data
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Redeker, Nancy, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the relations between pre-operative sleep patterns and post-operative physical function and mental health among patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Design: A repeated measures correlational design was used. Participants were recruited pre-operatively, and data were obtained during the week prior to surgery and at the first, fourth, and eight post-operative weeks. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Male and female cardiac surgery patients were recruited from two tertiary care hospitals in the Northeastern United States from 1999 through 2001. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Objective sleep variables [duration of nighttime sleep (NSLP), 24-hour sleep time (24SLP), sleep efficiency (SE), frequency (NWAK) and duration of awakenings (DURWAK)] and self-reported sleep quality were obtained pre-operatively. The dependent variables were self-reported physical function (PF), mental health (MH), vigor (VIG), fatigue, (FTG), total mood disturbance (TMD), and symptom distress (SDS) obtained during the fourth post-operative week. Methods: Objective sleep measures were obtained for 3 days during the week prior to surgery with wrist actigraphs (Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc., Ardsley, NY, USA). Participants completed sleep diaries that included a numeric rating of sleep quality (NRS) for each day that they wore the actigraphs and completed the Pittsburgh Sleep quality Index (PSQI), a measure of habitual sleep quality. Outcome variables were obtained with the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36 physical function and mental health components (PF and MH), the Profile of Mood States (TMD, VIG, FTG), and the Symptom Distress Scale (SDS) during the fourth post-operative week. Objective sleep pattern variables were calculated with the Action3 Computer Program (Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc., Arsley, NY, USA). Findings: The sample included 34 men and 10 women (mean age = 65 + 9.6 years). 55% (n = 24) had PSQI scores > 5, indicating significant sleep disturbance. Mean pre-operative sleep efficiency was 81% + 12. PSQI was associated with poorer PF (r = -.41, p < .01), lower VIG (r = -.51, p < 001), and higher SDS (r = .55, p < .001), FTG (r = .46, p < .01), and TMD (r = .39, p < .01). NRS measures of sleep quality had similar relationships with the dependent variables. SE was associated with higher MH (r = .37, p < .01) and lower TMD (r = -.34, p < .05) and FTG (r = -.28, p < .05). DURWAK was associated with lower PF (r = -.32, p =.07) and VIG (r = -.27, p = .07) and higher FTG (r = .34, < .05). NWAK was negatively associated with MH (r = -.47, p = .001). 24HSLP was positively associated with MH (r = .33, p < .05), PF (r = .30, p = .05), and VIG (r = .26, p = .09). There were no statistically significant relationships between NSLP or SL and the outcome variables. Conclusions: Pre-operative sleep disturbance appears to be a significant predictor of recovery at one month after cardiac surgery. Sleep efficiency and sleep continuity appear to be more relevant to physical function and mental health than total quantity of nighttime sleep or sleep latency. Implications: Patients with sleep disturbances may be at high risk for poor functional and mental health outcomes post-operatively. Assessment of sleep disturbance and sleep-promoting interventions may help to improve post-operative recovery.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Pre-operative Sleep on Physical Function and Mental Health After Cardiac Surgery: Preliminary Dataen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151824-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of Pre-operative Sleep on Physical Function and Mental Health After Cardiac Surgery: Preliminary Data</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Redeker, Nancy, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">redeker@nightingale.rutgers.ed</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the relations between pre-operative sleep patterns and post-operative physical function and mental health among patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Design: A repeated measures correlational design was used. Participants were recruited pre-operatively, and data were obtained during the week prior to surgery and at the first, fourth, and eight post-operative weeks. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Male and female cardiac surgery patients were recruited from two tertiary care hospitals in the Northeastern United States from 1999 through 2001. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: Objective sleep variables [duration of nighttime sleep (NSLP), 24-hour sleep time (24SLP), sleep efficiency (SE), frequency (NWAK) and duration of awakenings (DURWAK)] and self-reported sleep quality were obtained pre-operatively. The dependent variables were self-reported physical function (PF), mental health (MH), vigor (VIG), fatigue, (FTG), total mood disturbance (TMD), and symptom distress (SDS) obtained during the fourth post-operative week. Methods: Objective sleep measures were obtained for 3 days during the week prior to surgery with wrist actigraphs (Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc., Ardsley, NY, USA). Participants completed sleep diaries that included a numeric rating of sleep quality (NRS) for each day that they wore the actigraphs and completed the Pittsburgh Sleep quality Index (PSQI), a measure of habitual sleep quality. Outcome variables were obtained with the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36 physical function and mental health components (PF and MH), the Profile of Mood States (TMD, VIG, FTG), and the Symptom Distress Scale (SDS) during the fourth post-operative week. Objective sleep pattern variables were calculated with the Action3 Computer Program (Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc., Arsley, NY, USA). Findings: The sample included 34 men and 10 women (mean age = 65 + 9.6 years). 55% (n = 24) had PSQI scores &gt; 5, indicating significant sleep disturbance. Mean pre-operative sleep efficiency was 81% + 12. PSQI was associated with poorer PF (r = -.41, p &lt; .01), lower VIG (r = -.51, p &lt; 001), and higher SDS (r = .55, p &lt; .001), FTG (r = .46, p &lt; .01), and TMD (r = .39, p &lt; .01). NRS measures of sleep quality had similar relationships with the dependent variables. SE was associated with higher MH (r = .37, p &lt; .01) and lower TMD (r = -.34, p &lt; .05) and FTG (r = -.28, p &lt; .05). DURWAK was associated with lower PF (r = -.32, p =.07) and VIG (r = -.27, p = .07) and higher FTG (r = .34, &lt; .05). NWAK was negatively associated with MH (r = -.47, p = .001). 24HSLP was positively associated with MH (r = .33, p &lt; .05), PF (r = .30, p = .05), and VIG (r = .26, p = .09). There were no statistically significant relationships between NSLP or SL and the outcome variables. Conclusions: Pre-operative sleep disturbance appears to be a significant predictor of recovery at one month after cardiac surgery. Sleep efficiency and sleep continuity appear to be more relevant to physical function and mental health than total quantity of nighttime sleep or sleep latency. Implications: Patients with sleep disturbances may be at high risk for poor functional and mental health outcomes post-operatively. Assessment of sleep disturbance and sleep-promoting interventions may help to improve post-operative recovery.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:14:54Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:14:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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