2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151826
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing education in Spain: An European force
Abstract:
Nursing education in Spain: An European force
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Zabalegui, Adelaida
The delivery of health care services is changing dramatically. The increasingly complex nursing care is related to increased longevity, shorter hospital stays, scientific and technological advances and population mobility. Nursing education must keep pace with these changes that require more knowledge, new skills and new attitudes. Nursing Diploma programs are inappropriate to respond to the present societal needs. In Spain, as in other European countries, nursing education needs access to professionalism throughout baccalaureate, master and Ph.D. programs, within the European Union framework of the 1999 Bologna Declaration. This presentation provides an overview of the Nursing education situation in Spain. The author will discuss: 1) the educational structure in Nursing, 2) the role of the Ministry of Education in the academic discipline of Nursing, 3) responsibilities for the theoretical and clinical components in Nursing, 4) Relation between Nursing theory and practice, and 5) Collaboration of professors and students with other European Universities in Nursing programs. In 1977, Nursing Education in Spain became a University Diploma program consisting of three full-time years with an average teaching load of 230 credits. Since then, diverse nursing organizations have proposed, so far without success, numerous baccalaureate projects to the Spanish Ministry of Education. In 1983 the “Ley de Reforma Universitaria”, a law to reform the University, recognized the area of nursing knowledge and the need for nursing research. This legislative effort has not been followed by executive action. Only, two areas (midwife and mental health) have been recognized as post-diploma specialties. Thus, although, nursing contribution to health care is increasingly demanding and more complex, in Spain nurses still lack a framework for academic professional development. Although approximately 70% of all nurses are engaged in continuing education, they do not have academic recognition and do not have the possibility of higher academic degree. Recently, several Spanish Nursing Organizations (Teaching Nursing Association, Nursing Union, Student Nursing Association, International Council of Nursing, and Nursing School and Hospital Directors) have agreed on three educational demands: First, the fulfillment of the European standards within the Spanish University legislation. Second, the unacceptability of a diploma program of four full-time academic years. And third, the recognition of the baccalaureate degree. Two alternatives are envisioned to the baccalaureate programs. One consists in a four-year program, which substitutes and eliminates the diploma. The other is a 3 + 2 program; that is, three years of the diploma plus an optional two more years for a higher degree. The second option counts with broader support, and has already being implemented in public and private universities. Since 1998 four Universities, Alicante, Huelva, Rovira i Virgili and International de Catalunya, have offered 3 + 2 baccalaureate degrees. These additional 120 credits focus on nursing research, teaching, management, and advanced care. Although these BSN programs clearly improve health care practice, they still and unfortunately lack recognition from the Spanish Government. Thus, nurses in Spain are unable to access a Ph.D. degree in nursing. Nursing faculty are forced to obtain their BS and Ph.D. degrees in disciplines other than nursing (e.g. psychology, sociology, anthropology...) or need to enroll in foreign Universities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing education in Spain: An European forceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151826-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing education in Spain: An European force</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zabalegui, Adelaida</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">azabaleg@csc.unica.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The delivery of health care services is changing dramatically. The increasingly complex nursing care is related to increased longevity, shorter hospital stays, scientific and technological advances and population mobility. Nursing education must keep pace with these changes that require more knowledge, new skills and new attitudes. Nursing Diploma programs are inappropriate to respond to the present societal needs. In Spain, as in other European countries, nursing education needs access to professionalism throughout baccalaureate, master and Ph.D. programs, within the European Union framework of the 1999 Bologna Declaration. This presentation provides an overview of the Nursing education situation in Spain. The author will discuss: 1) the educational structure in Nursing, 2) the role of the Ministry of Education in the academic discipline of Nursing, 3) responsibilities for the theoretical and clinical components in Nursing, 4) Relation between Nursing theory and practice, and 5) Collaboration of professors and students with other European Universities in Nursing programs. In 1977, Nursing Education in Spain became a University Diploma program consisting of three full-time years with an average teaching load of 230 credits. Since then, diverse nursing organizations have proposed, so far without success, numerous baccalaureate projects to the Spanish Ministry of Education. In 1983 the &ldquo;Ley de Reforma Universitaria&rdquo;, a law to reform the University, recognized the area of nursing knowledge and the need for nursing research. This legislative effort has not been followed by executive action. Only, two areas (midwife and mental health) have been recognized as post-diploma specialties. Thus, although, nursing contribution to health care is increasingly demanding and more complex, in Spain nurses still lack a framework for academic professional development. Although approximately 70% of all nurses are engaged in continuing education, they do not have academic recognition and do not have the possibility of higher academic degree. Recently, several Spanish Nursing Organizations (Teaching Nursing Association, Nursing Union, Student Nursing Association, International Council of Nursing, and Nursing School and Hospital Directors) have agreed on three educational demands: First, the fulfillment of the European standards within the Spanish University legislation. Second, the unacceptability of a diploma program of four full-time academic years. And third, the recognition of the baccalaureate degree. Two alternatives are envisioned to the baccalaureate programs. One consists in a four-year program, which substitutes and eliminates the diploma. The other is a 3 + 2 program; that is, three years of the diploma plus an optional two more years for a higher degree. The second option counts with broader support, and has already being implemented in public and private universities. Since 1998 four Universities, Alicante, Huelva, Rovira i Virgili and International de Catalunya, have offered 3 + 2 baccalaureate degrees. These additional 120 credits focus on nursing research, teaching, management, and advanced care. Although these BSN programs clearly improve health care practice, they still and unfortunately lack recognition from the Spanish Government. Thus, nurses in Spain are unable to access a Ph.D. degree in nursing. Nursing faculty are forced to obtain their BS and Ph.D. degrees in disciplines other than nursing (e.g. psychology, sociology, anthropology...) or need to enroll in foreign Universities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:14:58Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:14:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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