2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151827
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Practices in Rural El Salvador
Abstract:
Health Practices in Rural El Salvador
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Rutherford, Mary
P.I. Institution Name:University of Southern Indiana
Objective: To investigate the health practices and lifeways of rural villagers in a remote area of El Salvador who had been displaced by the recent civil war. The purpose of the study was to explore their view on health and experiences of loss during the war. Design: Ethnography (Spradley, 1980, 1999; Agar, 1996). Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The participants included any resident of three rural Salvadoran villages who were 18 years of age and over. They represented various family structures and experiences in the civil war. Participants included nine families, with a total of 11 females and 1 male ranging in age from 18 to 72 years with a mean age of 45 years. The nine families had a total of 63 children. The study took place over a three-week visit during spring, 1999. This was the sixth trip to El Salvador by the researcher. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The research questions that guided the study were: “What does health mean to you? How has the war affected your health?” Methods: Data collection included participant observation, audio taped interviews, demographic information, and field notes. The Spanish-speaking key informant acted as the interpreter. All interviews were conducted on the porch of people’s homes where most socializing occurred. The content of all data was analyzed for recurrent themes. Findings: All nine families were displaced to refugee camps in Honduras during the civil war. The cultural themes that emerged from the data were: 1) Health: “It’s in God’s hands.” 2) War: “We lost everything; we had to leave running.” Many participants shared their feelings of God as the power in control of their health and lives. They used folk remedies before going to a local government clinic, occasionally delaying needed treatment until intervention became critical. Conclusions: The global community of nursing is challenged to encourage culture-specific care that acknowledges Salvadoran herbal remedies, strength of spirit, and a belief that a Supreme Being controls their lives. The health practices of the participants were shaped by their experiences of suffering from loss of family members during the war, displacement from their homes, and lack of potable water and environmental sanitation. Implications: To make a positive impact and effect change on health services in these rural areas, efforts should be directed toward democratic and community-based social and economic development within the context of the cultural system. Recent earthquakes (2001) have intensified the need for improvement in environmental factors including potable water. Public education that supports culturally sensitive family health is a priority for improved health outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Practices in Rural El Salvadoren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151827-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Practices in Rural El Salvador</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rutherford, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Southern Indiana</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mrutherf@usi.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To investigate the health practices and lifeways of rural villagers in a remote area of El Salvador who had been displaced by the recent civil war. The purpose of the study was to explore their view on health and experiences of loss during the war. Design: Ethnography (Spradley, 1980, 1999; Agar, 1996). Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The participants included any resident of three rural Salvadoran villages who were 18 years of age and over. They represented various family structures and experiences in the civil war. Participants included nine families, with a total of 11 females and 1 male ranging in age from 18 to 72 years with a mean age of 45 years. The nine families had a total of 63 children. The study took place over a three-week visit during spring, 1999. This was the sixth trip to El Salvador by the researcher. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variables: The research questions that guided the study were: &ldquo;What does health mean to you? How has the war affected your health?&rdquo; Methods: Data collection included participant observation, audio taped interviews, demographic information, and field notes. The Spanish-speaking key informant acted as the interpreter. All interviews were conducted on the porch of people&rsquo;s homes where most socializing occurred. The content of all data was analyzed for recurrent themes. Findings: All nine families were displaced to refugee camps in Honduras during the civil war. The cultural themes that emerged from the data were: 1) Health: &ldquo;It&rsquo;s in God&rsquo;s hands.&rdquo; 2) War: &ldquo;We lost everything; we had to leave running.&rdquo; Many participants shared their feelings of God as the power in control of their health and lives. They used folk remedies before going to a local government clinic, occasionally delaying needed treatment until intervention became critical. Conclusions: The global community of nursing is challenged to encourage culture-specific care that acknowledges Salvadoran herbal remedies, strength of spirit, and a belief that a Supreme Being controls their lives. The health practices of the participants were shaped by their experiences of suffering from loss of family members during the war, displacement from their homes, and lack of potable water and environmental sanitation. Implications: To make a positive impact and effect change on health services in these rural areas, efforts should be directed toward democratic and community-based social and economic development within the context of the cultural system. Recent earthquakes (2001) have intensified the need for improvement in environmental factors including potable water. Public education that supports culturally sensitive family health is a priority for improved health outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:15:00Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:15:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.