2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151830
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Menopause-Related Concerns and Experiences of Women with MS
Abstract:
Menopause-Related Concerns and Experiences of Women with MS
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Smeltzer, Suzanne
P.I. Institution Name:Villanova University
Objective: Perimenopause and menopause are ideal opportunities for health promotion. Women, including those with MS, live 20–30 years beyond menopause. Therefore, health promotion efforts must extend to women with MS. In order to address health promotion in women with MS, more information about their experiences is needed. The purpose of this study was to explore menopause-related experiences of women with MS and health promotion strategies they use to address menopause and changes in MS symptoms that occur with menopause. Design/Method: This qualitative study used a semi-structured interview of women with MS; they were asked about menopause symptoms, changes in MS symptoms with menopause, use of HRT and alternative therapies for menopausal symptoms, success in obtaining information from a health care provider about menopause and MS, satisfaction with that information and with health care related to menopause, use of health promotion strategies related to menopause and MS, and health screening. Transcripts of the interviews were analyzed for recurrent themes related to the study’s purpose. Sample: Network sampling was used to identify 18 menopausal or perimenopausal women with MS willing to participate in the study. Personal interviews were conducted in women’s homes and were audio taped. Findings: Although not all women in the sample had concerns and unmet needs related to menopause that differ from those of women without MS, there were nevertheless concerns and issues that were identified by many of them. Major themes identified included: 1) Interaction of MS and menopause, 2) Lack of information about menopause in the context of MS, 3) Use of information seeking strategies, 4) Lack of knowledge and insensitivity of health care providers, and 5) The need for women with MS to be assertive and proactive in obtaining information and in menopause-related health promotion strategies, included screening. Participants identified a possible interaction of MS and menopause. They reported uncertainty about the relationship of changes in their MS symptoms (e.g., excessive fatigue, memory loss) to menopause, progression of MS, or aging. Lack of information about menopause in the context of MS caused frustration and made their decision making about use of HRT very difficult. Their difficulty was compounded by risks of blood clots due to impaired mobility vs. benefits of HRT in MS and its ability to control hot flashes that increase MS symptoms. Participants indicated that few health care providers used a holistic approach and failed to consider their increased need for health screening (i.e., bone density testing) because of their MS and resulting disability. Conclusions and Implications: There is a need for all health care providers to listen to women’s concerns, to be prepared to answer their questions, and to take a holistic approach when providing health care to menopausal women with MS. Research related to the relationship between MS and menopause is needed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMenopause-Related Concerns and Experiences of Women with MSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151830-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Menopause-Related Concerns and Experiences of Women with MS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smeltzer, Suzanne</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Villanova University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">suzanne.smeltzer@villanova.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Perimenopause and menopause are ideal opportunities for health promotion. Women, including those with MS, live 20&ndash;30 years beyond menopause. Therefore, health promotion efforts must extend to women with MS. In order to address health promotion in women with MS, more information about their experiences is needed. The purpose of this study was to explore menopause-related experiences of women with MS and health promotion strategies they use to address menopause and changes in MS symptoms that occur with menopause. Design/Method: This qualitative study used a semi-structured interview of women with MS; they were asked about menopause symptoms, changes in MS symptoms with menopause, use of HRT and alternative therapies for menopausal symptoms, success in obtaining information from a health care provider about menopause and MS, satisfaction with that information and with health care related to menopause, use of health promotion strategies related to menopause and MS, and health screening. Transcripts of the interviews were analyzed for recurrent themes related to the study&rsquo;s purpose. Sample: Network sampling was used to identify 18 menopausal or perimenopausal women with MS willing to participate in the study. Personal interviews were conducted in women&rsquo;s homes and were audio taped. Findings: Although not all women in the sample had concerns and unmet needs related to menopause that differ from those of women without MS, there were nevertheless concerns and issues that were identified by many of them. Major themes identified included: 1) Interaction of MS and menopause, 2) Lack of information about menopause in the context of MS, 3) Use of information seeking strategies, 4) Lack of knowledge and insensitivity of health care providers, and 5) The need for women with MS to be assertive and proactive in obtaining information and in menopause-related health promotion strategies, included screening. Participants identified a possible interaction of MS and menopause. They reported uncertainty about the relationship of changes in their MS symptoms (e.g., excessive fatigue, memory loss) to menopause, progression of MS, or aging. Lack of information about menopause in the context of MS caused frustration and made their decision making about use of HRT very difficult. Their difficulty was compounded by risks of blood clots due to impaired mobility vs. benefits of HRT in MS and its ability to control hot flashes that increase MS symptoms. Participants indicated that few health care providers used a holistic approach and failed to consider their increased need for health screening (i.e., bone density testing) because of their MS and resulting disability. Conclusions and Implications: There is a need for all health care providers to listen to women&rsquo;s concerns, to be prepared to answer their questions, and to take a holistic approach when providing health care to menopausal women with MS. Research related to the relationship between MS and menopause is needed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:15:06Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:15:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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