2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151834
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Beyond Survival: Reclaiming Self After Leaving an Abusive Male Partner
Abstract:
Beyond Survival: Reclaiming Self After Leaving an Abusive Male Partner
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:June, 2001
Author:Wuest, Judith
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Brunswick
Title:Faculty of Nursing
Objective: to develop a substantive theory that explains the long-term experience of women who leave abusive male partners. Design: Feminist Grounded Theory. Population, Sample, Setting: 15 Caucasian women who lived in rural towns and geographically isolated areas in eastern Canada. Concept Studied: The process of leaving abusive male partners. Methods: After informed consent was granted, data were collected through unstructured tape-recorded interviews. Initially, women were asked to talk about how they left the relationship. Invariably, survivors spoke not only about preparing to leave, leaving, and remaining out but also about how they were now changing and moving on with their lives, suggesting that for survivors the process of leaving included this extended period. Interviews were transcribed with all identifying data removed. Data were analysed using the constant comparative methods of grounded theory. As concepts were identified in data analysis, information to illuminate the theoretical properties of emerging concepts was sought by theoretical sampling of data from repeat interviews and interviews with new participants. Theoretical coding was used to clarify relationships between concepts and to facilitate the development of a theoretical framework (Glaser, 1978). Findings: The basic social psychological process discovered was reclaiming self, a four stages process of counteracting abuse, breaking free, not going back, and moving on. In the last stage of moving on, which is the focus of this paper, women move beyond framing their lives as survivors of an abusive relationship through processes of figuring it out, putting it in its rightful place, launching new relationships, and taking on a new image. Figuring it out is the process of searching for reasons for both why the abuse happened and why she remained in the relationship “Putting it in its rightful place” is how one woman described the process of no longer allowing the abuse experience to define their existence. Launching new relationships takes place within a social environment where there is a pervasive expectation that women be partnered. Women spoke of their vigilance in new relationships; vigilance was enacted by setting and using criteria for themselves, for their partners, and for the relationships themselves. Taking on a new image is the process of leaving behind the image of “abused woman or survivor” and expressing pride in the person they have become to themselves and others. Conclusion: The analysis of the process of moving on has resulted in our recognition that the label “survivor” still gives primacy to abuse in women’s lives. Yet, women in this stage were clearly taking on a new image, and no longer saw or wanted the abuse or the survival experience to be the centre of their existence. Hence, although we believe that “survivor” may be an empowering term for women in earlier stages of reclaiming self, we believe that has the potential to disempower women who are struggling in the process of moving on. Implications: Care must be taken that women are not revictimized by the label survivor. Assessment must include differentiating woman’s stage in the process of leaving, and assistance must be tailored to her needs associated with that stage. Nurses also must be careful not to give primacy to abuse when, in fact, other tragedies may have become more central to a woman’s present health. At the same time, they must also acknowledge abuse as a significant part of woman’s past, be prepared for its resurfacing, and offer validation and anticipatory guidance.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jun-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBeyond Survival: Reclaiming Self After Leaving an Abusive Male Partneren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151834-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Beyond Survival: Reclaiming Self After Leaving an Abusive Male Partner</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">June, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wuest, Judith</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Brunswick</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Faculty of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wuest@unb.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: to develop a substantive theory that explains the long-term experience of women who leave abusive male partners. Design: Feminist Grounded Theory. Population, Sample, Setting: 15 Caucasian women who lived in rural towns and geographically isolated areas in eastern Canada. Concept Studied: The process of leaving abusive male partners. Methods: After informed consent was granted, data were collected through unstructured tape-recorded interviews. Initially, women were asked to talk about how they left the relationship. Invariably, survivors spoke not only about preparing to leave, leaving, and remaining out but also about how they were now changing and moving on with their lives, suggesting that for survivors the process of leaving included this extended period. Interviews were transcribed with all identifying data removed. Data were analysed using the constant comparative methods of grounded theory. As concepts were identified in data analysis, information to illuminate the theoretical properties of emerging concepts was sought by theoretical sampling of data from repeat interviews and interviews with new participants. Theoretical coding was used to clarify relationships between concepts and to facilitate the development of a theoretical framework (Glaser, 1978). Findings: The basic social psychological process discovered was reclaiming self, a four stages process of counteracting abuse, breaking free, not going back, and moving on. In the last stage of moving on, which is the focus of this paper, women move beyond framing their lives as survivors of an abusive relationship through processes of figuring it out, putting it in its rightful place, launching new relationships, and taking on a new image. Figuring it out is the process of searching for reasons for both why the abuse happened and why she remained in the relationship &ldquo;Putting it in its rightful place&rdquo; is how one woman described the process of no longer allowing the abuse experience to define their existence. Launching new relationships takes place within a social environment where there is a pervasive expectation that women be partnered. Women spoke of their vigilance in new relationships; vigilance was enacted by setting and using criteria for themselves, for their partners, and for the relationships themselves. Taking on a new image is the process of leaving behind the image of &ldquo;abused woman or survivor&rdquo; and expressing pride in the person they have become to themselves and others. Conclusion: The analysis of the process of moving on has resulted in our recognition that the label &ldquo;survivor&rdquo; still gives primacy to abuse in women&rsquo;s lives. Yet, women in this stage were clearly taking on a new image, and no longer saw or wanted the abuse or the survival experience to be the centre of their existence. Hence, although we believe that &ldquo;survivor&rdquo; may be an empowering term for women in earlier stages of reclaiming self, we believe that has the potential to disempower women who are struggling in the process of moving on. Implications: Care must be taken that women are not revictimized by the label survivor. Assessment must include differentiating woman&rsquo;s stage in the process of leaving, and assistance must be tailored to her needs associated with that stage. Nurses also must be careful not to give primacy to abuse when, in fact, other tragedies may have become more central to a woman&rsquo;s present health. At the same time, they must also acknowledge abuse as a significant part of woman&rsquo;s past, be prepared for its resurfacing, and offer validation and anticipatory guidance.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:15:13Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:15:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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