Fatigue, Self-Efficacy for Physical Activity, Physical Activity, and Quality of Life in Women with Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151840
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fatigue, Self-Efficacy for Physical Activity, Physical Activity, and Quality of Life in Women with Breast Cancer
Abstract:
Fatigue, Self-Efficacy for Physical Activity, Physical Activity, and Quality of Life in Women with Breast Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Haas, Barbara, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas at Tyler
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the direct and indirect influences of fatigue, self-efficacy for physical activity, and physical activity on quality of life (QOL) in women with breast cancer. A secondary purpose was to compare the relationships among these variables in women with breast cancer with a group of women who had no history of cancer. Design: This study utilized a descriptive correlational design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The targeted population was women receiving either chemotherapy or hormonal therapy for breast cancer. Inclusion criteria included: female over 18 years of age with any stage breast cancer; receiving chemotherapy for at least three cycles or hormonal therapy for at least three months; living independently in the community; and able to read and write English. A sample representing women with no history of cancer was also recruited. The final sample (n=128) included 73 women receiving either chemotherapy or hormonal therapy for any stage breast cancer and 55 women in a comparison group with no history of cancer. The participants were primarily Caucasian, educated, and married. Data were collected from August, 2000 through April, 2001. Participants were recruited from public and private physician's offices and breast cancer support groups in the north and east areas of Texas in the United States. Concepts: A research model, derived from a theoretical model that integrated selected concepts from Pender's Health Promotion Model and Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory, included the variables fatigue, self-efficacy for physical activity, physical activity, and QOL. Methods: Nurse colleagues working in physician offices and/or participating in breast cancer support groups identified eligible women. Two color-coded questionnaires were distributed to women willing to participate. The woman was instructed to complete the pink questionnaire two days after leaving the clinic. The woman with breast cancer was asked to give the blue packet to a woman of approximately the same age with no history of cancer. Questionnaires were returned in postage paid pre-addressed envelopes. Instruments used to measure study concepts included the Piper Fatigue Scale to evaluate fatigue; a researcher developed Physical Activity Assessment Inventory to measure self-efficacy for physical activity; the Human Activity Profile to calculate physical activity; and the McGill QOL Questionnaire to assess QOL. Data were entered into a statistical program and the data set was cleaned. Descriptive statistics, correlations, and multivariate analysis of covariance were conducted using SPSS 10.0. Path analysis was conducted using EQS 5.7. Findings: Correlational analyses suggested moderate to strong relationships among the research model variables (fatigue, self-efficacy for physical activity, physical activity, and QOL) for both groups of women. There was an inverse relationship between fatigue scores and the scores for self-efficacy for physical activity, physical activity, and QOL. There was a direct relationship among the scores for self-efficacy for physical activity, physical activity, and QOL. Using multivariate analysis of covariance, with age as the covariate, women receiving treatment for breast cancer reported higher levels of fatigue and lower levels of self-efficacy for physical activity and physical activity than women in the comparison group did. The physical and physical well-being QOL subscale scores differed between the groups. The psychological, support, and existential QOL subscale scores did not. Results from path analysis supported the research model, explaining 53% of the variance in QOL scores. Fatigue has direct and indirect influences on QOL that are partially mediated by self-efficacy for physical activity and physical activity. Self-efficacy for physical activity directly influences physical activity, which then directly influences QOL. Conclusions: Results from this study provide initial support for the theoretical model used as a framework for the study. Fatigue is a significant problem that has a negative impact on QOL for women receiving chemotherapy or hormonal therapy for breast cancer. Physical activity and self-efficacy for physical activity appear to partially mediate the effect of fatigue on QOL. Implications: This research provides knowledge to help guide nursing care of women receiving treatment for breast cancer. Clinicians can use results of this study to guide interventions that assist patients in remaining physically active during treatment and to provide anticipatory guidance regarding physical activity to women receiving treatment for breast cancer. Results from this study raised several additional questions. Qualitative study of the meaning of QOL for women with and without breast cancer is recommended. Larger samples with over sampling of minority women would provide information about ethnic differences regarding health promotion during treatment for cancer. Intervention studies to determine the effectiveness of enhancing self-efficacy and increasing physical activity to improve QOL are recommended.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFatigue, Self-Efficacy for Physical Activity, Physical Activity, and Quality of Life in Women with Breast Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151840-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Fatigue, Self-Efficacy for Physical Activity, Physical Activity, and Quality of Life in Women with Breast Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Haas, Barbara, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas at Tyler</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bhaas@mail.uttyl.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the direct and indirect influences of fatigue, self-efficacy for physical activity, and physical activity on quality of life (QOL) in women with breast cancer. A secondary purpose was to compare the relationships among these variables in women with breast cancer with a group of women who had no history of cancer. Design: This study utilized a descriptive correlational design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The targeted population was women receiving either chemotherapy or hormonal therapy for breast cancer. Inclusion criteria included: female over 18 years of age with any stage breast cancer; receiving chemotherapy for at least three cycles or hormonal therapy for at least three months; living independently in the community; and able to read and write English. A sample representing women with no history of cancer was also recruited. The final sample (n=128) included 73 women receiving either chemotherapy or hormonal therapy for any stage breast cancer and 55 women in a comparison group with no history of cancer. The participants were primarily Caucasian, educated, and married. Data were collected from August, 2000 through April, 2001. Participants were recruited from public and private physician's offices and breast cancer support groups in the north and east areas of Texas in the United States. Concepts: A research model, derived from a theoretical model that integrated selected concepts from Pender's Health Promotion Model and Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory, included the variables fatigue, self-efficacy for physical activity, physical activity, and QOL. Methods: Nurse colleagues working in physician offices and/or participating in breast cancer support groups identified eligible women. Two color-coded questionnaires were distributed to women willing to participate. The woman was instructed to complete the pink questionnaire two days after leaving the clinic. The woman with breast cancer was asked to give the blue packet to a woman of approximately the same age with no history of cancer. Questionnaires were returned in postage paid pre-addressed envelopes. Instruments used to measure study concepts included the Piper Fatigue Scale to evaluate fatigue; a researcher developed Physical Activity Assessment Inventory to measure self-efficacy for physical activity; the Human Activity Profile to calculate physical activity; and the McGill QOL Questionnaire to assess QOL. Data were entered into a statistical program and the data set was cleaned. Descriptive statistics, correlations, and multivariate analysis of covariance were conducted using SPSS 10.0. Path analysis was conducted using EQS 5.7. Findings: Correlational analyses suggested moderate to strong relationships among the research model variables (fatigue, self-efficacy for physical activity, physical activity, and QOL) for both groups of women. There was an inverse relationship between fatigue scores and the scores for self-efficacy for physical activity, physical activity, and QOL. There was a direct relationship among the scores for self-efficacy for physical activity, physical activity, and QOL. Using multivariate analysis of covariance, with age as the covariate, women receiving treatment for breast cancer reported higher levels of fatigue and lower levels of self-efficacy for physical activity and physical activity than women in the comparison group did. The physical and physical well-being QOL subscale scores differed between the groups. The psychological, support, and existential QOL subscale scores did not. Results from path analysis supported the research model, explaining 53% of the variance in QOL scores. Fatigue has direct and indirect influences on QOL that are partially mediated by self-efficacy for physical activity and physical activity. Self-efficacy for physical activity directly influences physical activity, which then directly influences QOL. Conclusions: Results from this study provide initial support for the theoretical model used as a framework for the study. Fatigue is a significant problem that has a negative impact on QOL for women receiving chemotherapy or hormonal therapy for breast cancer. Physical activity and self-efficacy for physical activity appear to partially mediate the effect of fatigue on QOL. Implications: This research provides knowledge to help guide nursing care of women receiving treatment for breast cancer. Clinicians can use results of this study to guide interventions that assist patients in remaining physically active during treatment and to provide anticipatory guidance regarding physical activity to women receiving treatment for breast cancer. Results from this study raised several additional questions. Qualitative study of the meaning of QOL for women with and without breast cancer is recommended. Larger samples with over sampling of minority women would provide information about ethnic differences regarding health promotion during treatment for cancer. Intervention studies to determine the effectiveness of enhancing self-efficacy and increasing physical activity to improve QOL are recommended.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:15:26Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:15:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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