Examining the Evidence on Community Engagement: Meeting the Needs of the Underserved Enhances Graduate Nursing Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151841
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examining the Evidence on Community Engagement: Meeting the Needs of the Underserved Enhances Graduate Nursing Education
Abstract:
Examining the Evidence on Community Engagement: Meeting the Needs of the Underserved Enhances Graduate Nursing Education
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Narsavage, Georgia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: The study was designed to evaluate whether the MSN community-based care program, "Community Engagement through Service-learning" had changed graduate nursing education and had met community needs. Design: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study using both qualitative and quantitative survey methods to examine the impact of a service-learning assignment. Planned ongoing reflections of students, faculty and community agencies supplemented summative evaluation from quantitative surveys. Sample and Setting: The sample included 45 students enrolled in 6 NP and CNS clinical courses, six advanced practice nursing faculty and 6 community agency partners. The setting was an urban area, including agencies serving multiple Health Resource Shortage Areas. Intervention and Outcome Variables: Faculty developed a service-learning assignment with two interrelated parts: the students' actively engaged in community service to meet an agency need, and the service outcome linked through course objectives and grading (of the service product) to academic study. The quantitative questionnaire and qualitative guide for reflection were adapted from nursing education publications (Bailey, et al., 1999). Methods: Each student participated in at least a 15-hour experience in service- learning, completed a group project, and prepared a product that was graded. They then completed the surveys or participated in a qualitative focus group at the end of the course. Students signed an IRB-approved informed consent to allow dissemination of their evaluations. All focus group interviews were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. One member from each focus group was asked to review the transcript to verify that it was representative of the discussion. Data were analyzed using SPSS for quantitative data and NU*DIST for qualitative data. Findings: Students grew in personal learning in understanding their role as a resource to the community (90.9%) and the challenges/barriers faced by community agencies (81.8%). The community engagement experience enhanced their academic learning, often by enriching classroom discussions (72.7%). Students saw the community as a resource and recognized their service as beneficial to the community (81.8%). Students also reflected on their greater understanding of the internal and external factors affecting the agency, such as the impact of the "Welfare to Work" program on the community and the difficulties participants faced in "working". An NP student's reflection on her project with the homeless through the diabetic association indicated that she now knew why her diabetic client might not get the lab work ordered - who cares about the HbA1g when food and a place to stay are critical needs. The students' open-ended responses and focus group data analyses corroborated the two themes of personal learning and community learning. Open-ended responses identified community service as valuable to the profession of nursing and for policy development. Community agencies reflected that "the students' projects are impacting the care in the community ... (it) has been great." Projects completed were "Safety" teaching modules for schools- now adopted by all 4th grade teachers in the school district, teaching "games" for nutrition in diabetes that were pictorial rather than written, an Hispanic outreach program for Health Aid training, health fairs, a module for the Red Cross HIV/AIDS curriculum focused on caregivers, linking hospice nurses to heath aid training to cover issues of grief and death, developing and training Senior Center workers on the use of functional assessment tools,etc. Weaknesses of the program indicated a need for more orientation (59%) and less structured time requirements (54%. Additionally APN faculty connected their expertise to the community while meeting the goals of academic promotion by obtaining grant funding to support their agency partner's projects and dissemination of the outcomes in a scholarly forum. Conclusions: Community engagement resulting in "personal awareness" and "community awareness" were identified in qualitative and quantitative data, measured after students moved from traditional health care settings. Personal growth included self-confidence and ability to serve as community resources. There was a need for improved orientation and flexibility in time requirements. A pre-test before the post-test could identify the degree of change. Implications: Written/oral reflections on community service experiences could guide students to examine ethical, legal, and policy implications for populations served. Course revisions to focus on political action could provide the next step in connecting the community insight, such as the "Welfare to Work" program challenges, into actions needed to change the system. Development of a manual for faculty, students and agencies could address the orientation problem. Flexibility with unstructured time can be options for faculty to revise assignments. Overall, graduate nursing education can be improved by meeting community needs.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamining the Evidence on Community Engagement: Meeting the Needs of the Underserved Enhances Graduate Nursing Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151841-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Examining the Evidence on Community Engagement: Meeting the Needs of the Underserved Enhances Graduate Nursing Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Narsavage, Georgia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gln2@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The study was designed to evaluate whether the MSN community-based care program, &quot;Community Engagement through Service-learning&quot; had changed graduate nursing education and had met community needs. Design: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study using both qualitative and quantitative survey methods to examine the impact of a service-learning assignment. Planned ongoing reflections of students, faculty and community agencies supplemented summative evaluation from quantitative surveys. Sample and Setting: The sample included 45 students enrolled in 6 NP and CNS clinical courses, six advanced practice nursing faculty and 6 community agency partners. The setting was an urban area, including agencies serving multiple Health Resource Shortage Areas. Intervention and Outcome Variables: Faculty developed a service-learning assignment with two interrelated parts: the students' actively engaged in community service to meet an agency need, and the service outcome linked through course objectives and grading (of the service product) to academic study. The quantitative questionnaire and qualitative guide for reflection were adapted from nursing education publications (Bailey, et al., 1999). Methods: Each student participated in at least a 15-hour experience in service- learning, completed a group project, and prepared a product that was graded. They then completed the surveys or participated in a qualitative focus group at the end of the course. Students signed an IRB-approved informed consent to allow dissemination of their evaluations. All focus group interviews were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. One member from each focus group was asked to review the transcript to verify that it was representative of the discussion. Data were analyzed using SPSS for quantitative data and NU*DIST for qualitative data. Findings: Students grew in personal learning in understanding their role as a resource to the community (90.9%) and the challenges/barriers faced by community agencies (81.8%). The community engagement experience enhanced their academic learning, often by enriching classroom discussions (72.7%). Students saw the community as a resource and recognized their service as beneficial to the community (81.8%). Students also reflected on their greater understanding of the internal and external factors affecting the agency, such as the impact of the &quot;Welfare to Work&quot; program on the community and the difficulties participants faced in &quot;working&quot;. An NP student's reflection on her project with the homeless through the diabetic association indicated that she now knew why her diabetic client might not get the lab work ordered - who cares about the HbA1g when food and a place to stay are critical needs. The students' open-ended responses and focus group data analyses corroborated the two themes of personal learning and community learning. Open-ended responses identified community service as valuable to the profession of nursing and for policy development. Community agencies reflected that &quot;the students' projects are impacting the care in the community ... (it) has been great.&quot; Projects completed were &quot;Safety&quot; teaching modules for schools- now adopted by all 4th grade teachers in the school district, teaching &quot;games&quot; for nutrition in diabetes that were pictorial rather than written, an Hispanic outreach program for Health Aid training, health fairs, a module for the Red Cross HIV/AIDS curriculum focused on caregivers, linking hospice nurses to heath aid training to cover issues of grief and death, developing and training Senior Center workers on the use of functional assessment tools,etc. Weaknesses of the program indicated a need for more orientation (59%) and less structured time requirements (54%. Additionally APN faculty connected their expertise to the community while meeting the goals of academic promotion by obtaining grant funding to support their agency partner's projects and dissemination of the outcomes in a scholarly forum. Conclusions: Community engagement resulting in &quot;personal awareness&quot; and &quot;community awareness&quot; were identified in qualitative and quantitative data, measured after students moved from traditional health care settings. Personal growth included self-confidence and ability to serve as community resources. There was a need for improved orientation and flexibility in time requirements. A pre-test before the post-test could identify the degree of change. Implications: Written/oral reflections on community service experiences could guide students to examine ethical, legal, and policy implications for populations served. Course revisions to focus on political action could provide the next step in connecting the community insight, such as the &quot;Welfare to Work&quot; program challenges, into actions needed to change the system. Development of a manual for faculty, students and agencies could address the orientation problem. Flexibility with unstructured time can be options for faculty to revise assignments. Overall, graduate nursing education can be improved by meeting community needs.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:15:28Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:15:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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