Building on Background Factors: Behavioral Changes following Entorhinal Cortex Injury

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151843
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building on Background Factors: Behavioral Changes following Entorhinal Cortex Injury
Abstract:
Building on Background Factors: Behavioral Changes following Entorhinal Cortex Injury
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Davis, Alice
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: Sensory information needed for hippocampal memory and learning is provided through the entorhinal cortex (EC). Destruction of EC, a salient feature of Alzheimer's-type dementia, disconnects multisensory fibers to hippocampus interrupting the relationship between multisensory integration and memory and learning. This study examined specific changes in animal behaviors following bilateral EC damage. Design & Sample: In this repeated measures experimental study male rats received bilateral EC damage (n=25) or sham surgery (n=10). Variables: Response to tactile stimuli was graded using a 3 point-scale. Eating activity was determined using body weight and food ingestion. A water maze was used to test spatial learning. Findings: EC injured animals (86%) demonstrated hypersensitivity to tactile stimuli and changes in touch were significant across time (f=5.99, p=.0024) and time by group (f=5.99, p=.0024). Changes in mean daily weight between groups were significant for post-operative days 2, 3, and 4 respectively (f=13.19; p=.001; f=6.65, p=.016; f=4.37, p=.047) and across time (f=4.48, p=.0136). Spatial learning was impaired in EC animals across all days for swim time. Conclusion: Response to tactile stimulation, eating activity, and cognitive function is significantly altered after EC injury. Implications: The Need-driven Behavior model (NDB) relies on neurological background factors to explain disruptive behaviors. Following EC injury, (regional neurological damage) similar behaviors to those exhibited in the NBD can be created in an animal model. Knowledge from animal models supports the initial step in developing interventions that minimize behavioral effects of EC damage.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding on Background Factors: Behavioral Changes following Entorhinal Cortex Injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151843-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Building on Background Factors: Behavioral Changes following Entorhinal Cortex Injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Davis, Alice</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aedavis@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Sensory information needed for hippocampal memory and learning is provided through the entorhinal cortex (EC). Destruction of EC, a salient feature of Alzheimer's-type dementia, disconnects multisensory fibers to hippocampus interrupting the relationship between multisensory integration and memory and learning. This study examined specific changes in animal behaviors following bilateral EC damage. Design &amp; Sample: In this repeated measures experimental study male rats received bilateral EC damage (n=25) or sham surgery (n=10). Variables: Response to tactile stimuli was graded using a 3 point-scale. Eating activity was determined using body weight and food ingestion. A water maze was used to test spatial learning. Findings: EC injured animals (86%) demonstrated hypersensitivity to tactile stimuli and changes in touch were significant across time (f=5.99, p=.0024) and time by group (f=5.99, p=.0024). Changes in mean daily weight between groups were significant for post-operative days 2, 3, and 4 respectively (f=13.19; p=.001; f=6.65, p=.016; f=4.37, p=.047) and across time (f=4.48, p=.0136). Spatial learning was impaired in EC animals across all days for swim time. Conclusion: Response to tactile stimulation, eating activity, and cognitive function is significantly altered after EC injury. Implications: The Need-driven Behavior model (NDB) relies on neurological background factors to explain disruptive behaviors. Following EC injury, (regional neurological damage) similar behaviors to those exhibited in the NBD can be created in an animal model. Knowledge from animal models supports the initial step in developing interventions that minimize behavioral effects of EC damage.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:15:32Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:15:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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