Practice-Oriented Education: A Comparison of Perceived Senior Student and Nurse Leader Workplace Needs and Strategies to Meet Them

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151846
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Practice-Oriented Education: A Comparison of Perceived Senior Student and Nurse Leader Workplace Needs and Strategies to Meet Them
Abstract:
Practice-Oriented Education: A Comparison of Perceived Senior Student and Nurse Leader Workplace Needs and Strategies to Meet Them
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:DeMarco, Rosanna, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Boston College
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: This project allowed students and nurse leaders to explore 1) what qualities they needed in order to be successful after graduation and what they perceived should be the needed supports for them in their transition, in the case of the students and 2) what qualities were necessary for success in new graduate nurse employees and the kinds of supports they felt they needed to provide to this group of new employees to increase retention and decrease burnout, in the case of the nurse leaders. Design: The design was descriptive using a survey tool. Population: A volunteer convenience sample was used. The sample was composed of two cohort groups. One group represented senior nursing students from a large, private school of nursing in metropolitan Boston, Massachusetts (n=16) and the other was composed of national group of nurse leaders in a variety of professional positions actively employed in healthcare delivery or education (n=62). The nurse leader cohort included executive vice presidents of nursing services, directors of nursing services, managers, midwives, nurse- practitioners, educators in academic health centers and academia, and doctoral students in the Northeast. In addition to conference respondents, advanced practice graduate students from the same university of the undergraduate cohort and nurse leaders from a Magnet hospital and a community hospital participated. The survey was distributed to both groups during the Spring of 2001. Concept or Variables Studied or Intervention and Outcome: Five structured questions were asked of both cohort groups. Examples of the questions posed to the students were: 1) What are the professional qualities that you think nurse administrators require of new graduates? 2) What are the personal qualities that you think nurse administrators require of new graduates? 3) What kind of organizational culture would empower the voices of new graduates? 4) Nursing student's talk openly about seasoned nurses being disheartened related to shortages, mandatory overtime, conflicts between state nursing associations and the ANA and they report being questioned about why they are considering being a nurse. What strategies would you suggest that would help you in dealing with these issues of the profession? 5) What would you suggest would be practical ways of creating intra-professional alliances? The same questions were changed for the nurse leaders to reflect their needs of new graduate employees. Methods: After explaining the study to the participants, each cohort in different settings completed the survey (self-report). Analysis included a member checking reduction of manifest themes imbedded in the recorded written responses (Miles & Huberman, 1994). Coding categories began as descriptions then progressed to pattern codes or themes between the researchers. To assure that coding and categorizing was not being "pushed" by the invested researchers/educators, an objective third party (a graduate research assistant who was not involved in the study or the survey process) was instructed in the research analysis method and analyzed the data independently. The graduate research assistant's role was to serve as an assurance of representation of the reality of the data (trustworthiness/credibility) (Polit & Hungler, 1999). Findings: The themes of professional and personal qualities although asked as separate questions for both groups often merged. They were categorized as values, attitudes, and skills. Both groups corroborated in identifying loyalty, honesty, advocacy, commitment to learning, having the ability to negotiate, having initiative, and being tolerant as well as resilient as examples of key themes. Both groups identified the need to create approachability in nurse leaders and the need to allow for activities to increase reflection in practice. Key suggestions were to create "story-telling" groups and specific focus groups that met regularly with a targeted role to act on what was discovered. Positive role models, mentoring programs, and the ability to confront negativity directly through negotiation skills development and building confidence were also described as ways to deal with negative behaviors in the workplace as well as develop partnerships with other seasoned nurses. Conclusions: Theme analysis indicated close corroboration between nursing students and nurse leaders. Neither group identified the organizational or institutional constraints on their suggestions but articulated focal points for curricular and new graduate employment support/education development that would have institutional effects over time. Implications: This study demonstrates the need to concretize partnerships between service and educational institutions. The findings suggest everybody is on the "same page" regarding the needs for successful employment in institutionally based nursing practice. We need to formalize work/education teams to advance the mission of practice- oriented education and create a formalized bridge between graduation and employment.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePractice-Oriented Education: A Comparison of Perceived Senior Student and Nurse Leader Workplace Needs and Strategies to Meet Themen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151846-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Practice-Oriented Education: A Comparison of Perceived Senior Student and Nurse Leader Workplace Needs and Strategies to Meet Them</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">DeMarco, Rosanna, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boston College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rosanna.demarco@bc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This project allowed students and nurse leaders to explore 1) what qualities they needed in order to be successful after graduation and what they perceived should be the needed supports for them in their transition, in the case of the students and 2) what qualities were necessary for success in new graduate nurse employees and the kinds of supports they felt they needed to provide to this group of new employees to increase retention and decrease burnout, in the case of the nurse leaders. Design: The design was descriptive using a survey tool. Population: A volunteer convenience sample was used. The sample was composed of two cohort groups. One group represented senior nursing students from a large, private school of nursing in metropolitan Boston, Massachusetts (n=16) and the other was composed of national group of nurse leaders in a variety of professional positions actively employed in healthcare delivery or education (n=62). The nurse leader cohort included executive vice presidents of nursing services, directors of nursing services, managers, midwives, nurse- practitioners, educators in academic health centers and academia, and doctoral students in the Northeast. In addition to conference respondents, advanced practice graduate students from the same university of the undergraduate cohort and nurse leaders from a Magnet hospital and a community hospital participated. The survey was distributed to both groups during the Spring of 2001. Concept or Variables Studied or Intervention and Outcome: Five structured questions were asked of both cohort groups. Examples of the questions posed to the students were: 1) What are the professional qualities that you think nurse administrators require of new graduates? 2) What are the personal qualities that you think nurse administrators require of new graduates? 3) What kind of organizational culture would empower the voices of new graduates? 4) Nursing student's talk openly about seasoned nurses being disheartened related to shortages, mandatory overtime, conflicts between state nursing associations and the ANA and they report being questioned about why they are considering being a nurse. What strategies would you suggest that would help you in dealing with these issues of the profession? 5) What would you suggest would be practical ways of creating intra-professional alliances? The same questions were changed for the nurse leaders to reflect their needs of new graduate employees. Methods: After explaining the study to the participants, each cohort in different settings completed the survey (self-report). Analysis included a member checking reduction of manifest themes imbedded in the recorded written responses (Miles &amp; Huberman, 1994). Coding categories began as descriptions then progressed to pattern codes or themes between the researchers. To assure that coding and categorizing was not being &quot;pushed&quot; by the invested researchers/educators, an objective third party (a graduate research assistant who was not involved in the study or the survey process) was instructed in the research analysis method and analyzed the data independently. The graduate research assistant's role was to serve as an assurance of representation of the reality of the data (trustworthiness/credibility) (Polit &amp; Hungler, 1999). Findings: The themes of professional and personal qualities although asked as separate questions for both groups often merged. They were categorized as values, attitudes, and skills. Both groups corroborated in identifying loyalty, honesty, advocacy, commitment to learning, having the ability to negotiate, having initiative, and being tolerant as well as resilient as examples of key themes. Both groups identified the need to create approachability in nurse leaders and the need to allow for activities to increase reflection in practice. Key suggestions were to create &quot;story-telling&quot; groups and specific focus groups that met regularly with a targeted role to act on what was discovered. Positive role models, mentoring programs, and the ability to confront negativity directly through negotiation skills development and building confidence were also described as ways to deal with negative behaviors in the workplace as well as develop partnerships with other seasoned nurses. Conclusions: Theme analysis indicated close corroboration between nursing students and nurse leaders. Neither group identified the organizational or institutional constraints on their suggestions but articulated focal points for curricular and new graduate employment support/education development that would have institutional effects over time. Implications: This study demonstrates the need to concretize partnerships between service and educational institutions. The findings suggest everybody is on the &quot;same page&quot; regarding the needs for successful employment in institutionally based nursing practice. We need to formalize work/education teams to advance the mission of practice- oriented education and create a formalized bridge between graduation and employment.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:15:39Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:15:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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