2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151850
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Orphan Care in Africa: Culturally Sensitive Responses in a Time of Crisis
Abstract:
Orphan Care in Africa: Culturally Sensitive Responses in a Time of Crisis
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Beard, Betty
P.I. Institution Name:Eastern Michigan University
Title:Professor
Objective: Malawi, small and land-locked in central Africa, is one of the countries worse hit by the HIV/AIDS epidemic. High birth rates and high AIDS-related mortality contribute to Malawi's large and growing number of orphans as well as to child-headed households. In a country of 11 million people, most of who live in abject poverty, it is estimated that there are already 900,000 orphaned children. The purpose of this study was to identify appropriate models of orphan care in sub-Saharan Africa. Design: A descriptive, exploratory design was used for this study. Population/sample/setting/years: This study, conducted in mid 2001, focused on the country of Malawi. It began in the area of Mulaje in the southern part of Malawi and proceeded throughout the country ending in the small town of Chitemba in the northern section of the country. The 4 person research team traveled about 1200 miles on mostly dirt roads that resembled the lunar landscape. Sixteen orphan care projects were visited during the 15 day time period. These projects were responsible for 42.930 children but were only able to serve 14,158 children due to financial constraints. Hundreds of administrators, village committee members, village chiefs/headmen, volunteers, guardians, along with at least 2,000 children, participated in providing information for this study. Concepts studied: Questions emerged as the study progressed. The central question asked during each visit was: Tell us about your project. Methods: This was a cross-sectional field study. Projects were identified by one of the members of the team who lives in Malawi. Letters were sent to the program managers three weeks prior to the study. In the letter, managers were told that they would be asked to present: an overview of their program including: history, goals and objectives, management structure; nature/type of child or family assistance; catchment area; future plans; in-country linkages (e.g. with churches or other community organizations); international support (e.g. financial and material); use of volunteers; and overall budget. The overall aim of the study was to identify strengths and best practices of a sample of orphan care programs and stimulate discussion, during the visits, of what is "most appropriate" for the children and families affected. The research team, essentially, listened and learned. Findings: Four models of orphan care, and several sub-components to these models, emerged. The models identified were: community based orphan care with an outreach or development approach; community based orphan care with a daycare center approach; child village; and orphanage. Each model has strengths/opportunities and weaknesses/challenges. There is a general consensus that the community based orphan care models were the most appropriate for African culture. Conclusion: Concerns center on the dire predictions for numbers of African children who will be orphaned in the near future. Malawian models of care can be replicated in other sub-Saharan countries. However, factors such as a crumbling economic situation, the already stretched extended family, and the need for crisis care (eg for newborns, babies, and extremely ill families) must be considered in the context of the culture in which people have always lived. The strength of the culture lies in its commitment to community care. Implications: HIV/AIDS in Africa is a complex and not easily understood problem. Children who are orphaned due to the death of one or both parents from AIDS are the outcome or result of the problem. The projected numbers of these children is staggering. This is a pandemic. The numbers of children orphaned due to HIV/AIDS in Africa are projected to be worse than the number of children orphaned for any other reason in the history of the world including all wars.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOrphan Care in Africa: Culturally Sensitive Responses in a Time of Crisisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151850-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Orphan Care in Africa: Culturally Sensitive Responses in a Time of Crisis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Beard, Betty</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Eastern Michigan University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jbeard140@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Malawi, small and land-locked in central Africa, is one of the countries worse hit by the HIV/AIDS epidemic. High birth rates and high AIDS-related mortality contribute to Malawi's large and growing number of orphans as well as to child-headed households. In a country of 11 million people, most of who live in abject poverty, it is estimated that there are already 900,000 orphaned children. The purpose of this study was to identify appropriate models of orphan care in sub-Saharan Africa. Design: A descriptive, exploratory design was used for this study. Population/sample/setting/years: This study, conducted in mid 2001, focused on the country of Malawi. It began in the area of Mulaje in the southern part of Malawi and proceeded throughout the country ending in the small town of Chitemba in the northern section of the country. The 4 person research team traveled about 1200 miles on mostly dirt roads that resembled the lunar landscape. Sixteen orphan care projects were visited during the 15 day time period. These projects were responsible for 42.930 children but were only able to serve 14,158 children due to financial constraints. Hundreds of administrators, village committee members, village chiefs/headmen, volunteers, guardians, along with at least 2,000 children, participated in providing information for this study. Concepts studied: Questions emerged as the study progressed. The central question asked during each visit was: Tell us about your project. Methods: This was a cross-sectional field study. Projects were identified by one of the members of the team who lives in Malawi. Letters were sent to the program managers three weeks prior to the study. In the letter, managers were told that they would be asked to present: an overview of their program including: history, goals and objectives, management structure; nature/type of child or family assistance; catchment area; future plans; in-country linkages (e.g. with churches or other community organizations); international support (e.g. financial and material); use of volunteers; and overall budget. The overall aim of the study was to identify strengths and best practices of a sample of orphan care programs and stimulate discussion, during the visits, of what is &quot;most appropriate&quot; for the children and families affected. The research team, essentially, listened and learned. Findings: Four models of orphan care, and several sub-components to these models, emerged. The models identified were: community based orphan care with an outreach or development approach; community based orphan care with a daycare center approach; child village; and orphanage. Each model has strengths/opportunities and weaknesses/challenges. There is a general consensus that the community based orphan care models were the most appropriate for African culture. Conclusion: Concerns center on the dire predictions for numbers of African children who will be orphaned in the near future. Malawian models of care can be replicated in other sub-Saharan countries. However, factors such as a crumbling economic situation, the already stretched extended family, and the need for crisis care (eg for newborns, babies, and extremely ill families) must be considered in the context of the culture in which people have always lived. The strength of the culture lies in its commitment to community care. Implications: HIV/AIDS in Africa is a complex and not easily understood problem. Children who are orphaned due to the death of one or both parents from AIDS are the outcome or result of the problem. The projected numbers of these children is staggering. This is a pandemic. The numbers of children orphaned due to HIV/AIDS in Africa are projected to be worse than the number of children orphaned for any other reason in the history of the world including all wars.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:15:47Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:15:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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