Reliability and Validity of the Japanese Version of the Perceptions of Physical Restraint Use Questionnaire

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151853
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reliability and Validity of the Japanese Version of the Perceptions of Physical Restraint Use Questionnaire
Abstract:
Reliability and Validity of the Japanese Version of the Perceptions of Physical Restraint Use Questionnaire
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Akamine, Yoriko
P.I. Institution Name:University of the Ryukyus
Title:Associate Professor
Concepts: The primary concept in this study is the use of physical restraints with elderly Japanese clients. Binding older adults to beds or wheel chairs was a common practice in Japan for many years. Implementing policies supporting physical restraint-free care is now the goal of many Japanese nurse leaders. However, there is a lack of scientific study about long-term care personnel's perceptions toward restraint use in the elderly. Scientifically researching the multiple issues involved with staff insight about restraint use should enhance the movement toward restraint-free care. Objective: To develop a reliable Japanese tool to evaluate the perceptions of restraint use in the elderly by nursing staff working in long-term care facilities. Design: The researchers chose the United States-based Perceptions of Physical Restraint Use Questionnaire (PRUQ), by Strumpf and Evans, as a tool. The PRUQ has a reliability of .80 using Cronbach's á- coefficient. After receiving approval from Dr. Evans the researchers cross-translated the PRUQ into Japanese. A back-translation technique examined the translation's effectiveness. The researchers then took the PRUQ-J to a population and setting to check reliability and validity. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A convenience sample (N=162) of nursing care staff included licensed nurses (n=63) and care workers (n=99) in practice at a long-term care facility in Okinawa, Japan. The population's response rate was 93.8% from 58 licensed nurses and 94 care workers. The study occurred over the month of April 2000. Methods: The subjects completed demographic questions and the PRUQ-J in their free time. The respondents repeated the PRUQ-J two to three weeks later for a test-retest reliability check. Anonymity and other standard confidentiality procedures ensured the rights of the nursing care personnel. The PRUQ-J included a five-item Likert scale from "not at all important" (1 point), to "most important" (5 points) for measuring perceptions of restraint use. A computer software package, the SPSS, statistically examined the reliability and validity of the PRUQ- J. Findings: In the test-retest, Pearson's correlation coefficients were 0.924 for nurses and 0.931 for care workers (p<0.01). Cronbach's á- coefficients were 0.911 for nurses and 0.922 for care workers (p<0.01). The PRUQ-J had 3 factors to explain 61.84% and all of the 17 question items were more than 0.5 in factor loading. The validity of PRUQ-J supported construct validity and content validity. Conclusions: These findings suggest that the PRUQ-J is a valid and reliable tool for evaluating the perceptions of restraint use among Japanese nurses and care workers. However, to increase the PRUQ-J's usefulness more evidence of construct validity is needed. Future research should include analysis of stability in diverse nursing populations and its' effectiveness with other tools. Implications: Examples of further studies include expanding the PRUQ-J to other settings such as acute care, and combining use of the PRUQ-J with other methods of measurement. A far-reaching implication includes the potential to utilize an internationally valid scale for comparative research between nations.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReliability and Validity of the Japanese Version of the Perceptions of Physical Restraint Use Questionnaireen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151853-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Reliability and Validity of the Japanese Version of the Perceptions of Physical Restraint Use Questionnaire</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Akamine, Yoriko</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of the Ryukyus</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yaka@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Concepts: The primary concept in this study is the use of physical restraints with elderly Japanese clients. Binding older adults to beds or wheel chairs was a common practice in Japan for many years. Implementing policies supporting physical restraint-free care is now the goal of many Japanese nurse leaders. However, there is a lack of scientific study about long-term care personnel's perceptions toward restraint use in the elderly. Scientifically researching the multiple issues involved with staff insight about restraint use should enhance the movement toward restraint-free care. Objective: To develop a reliable Japanese tool to evaluate the perceptions of restraint use in the elderly by nursing staff working in long-term care facilities. Design: The researchers chose the United States-based Perceptions of Physical Restraint Use Questionnaire (PRUQ), by Strumpf and Evans, as a tool. The PRUQ has a reliability of .80 using Cronbach's &aacute;- coefficient. After receiving approval from Dr. Evans the researchers cross-translated the PRUQ into Japanese. A back-translation technique examined the translation's effectiveness. The researchers then took the PRUQ-J to a population and setting to check reliability and validity. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A convenience sample (N=162) of nursing care staff included licensed nurses (n=63) and care workers (n=99) in practice at a long-term care facility in Okinawa, Japan. The population's response rate was 93.8% from 58 licensed nurses and 94 care workers. The study occurred over the month of April 2000. Methods: The subjects completed demographic questions and the PRUQ-J in their free time. The respondents repeated the PRUQ-J two to three weeks later for a test-retest reliability check. Anonymity and other standard confidentiality procedures ensured the rights of the nursing care personnel. The PRUQ-J included a five-item Likert scale from &quot;not at all important&quot; (1 point), to &quot;most important&quot; (5 points) for measuring perceptions of restraint use. A computer software package, the SPSS, statistically examined the reliability and validity of the PRUQ- J. Findings: In the test-retest, Pearson's correlation coefficients were 0.924 for nurses and 0.931 for care workers (p&lt;0.01). Cronbach's &aacute;- coefficients were 0.911 for nurses and 0.922 for care workers (p&lt;0.01). The PRUQ-J had 3 factors to explain 61.84% and all of the 17 question items were more than 0.5 in factor loading. The validity of PRUQ-J supported construct validity and content validity. Conclusions: These findings suggest that the PRUQ-J is a valid and reliable tool for evaluating the perceptions of restraint use among Japanese nurses and care workers. However, to increase the PRUQ-J's usefulness more evidence of construct validity is needed. Future research should include analysis of stability in diverse nursing populations and its' effectiveness with other tools. Implications: Examples of further studies include expanding the PRUQ-J to other settings such as acute care, and combining use of the PRUQ-J with other methods of measurement. A far-reaching implication includes the potential to utilize an internationally valid scale for comparative research between nations.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:15:53Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:15:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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