Hypertension Control and Related Variables among Urban and Rural Adults in Taiwan

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151854
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hypertension Control and Related Variables among Urban and Rural Adults in Taiwan
Abstract:
Hypertension Control and Related Variables among Urban and Rural Adults in Taiwan
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Chang, Luna
P.I. Institution Name:Fooyin Institute of Technology
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: In the past decades, literature on hypertension treatment has demonstrated that a healthy lifestyle is one of the best strategies for hypertension control. However, only using the communication of health information is not enough to change people's lifestyle effectively. As recently the health institutes in Taiwan applied different media and health promotion methods to provide people health knowledge, it still could not completely influence the community population. In order to design a more effective health promotion program on hypertension control, the objective of this study is to explore the mechanisms of behavioral change by the application of a health behavioral theory. Design: This project was a cross-sectional study and applied the Transtheoretical Model to assess six health behaviors among hypertensive adults by a mail, telephone and face to face survey. Six health behaviors included a reduced fat diet, alcohol use, smoking, weight control, physical activity and blood pressure checkups. Different processes and stages of change for these six health behaviors were compared between rural and urban study population. Then, the processes of behavior change were used as independent variables to determine the outcome- stages of behavior change. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A questionnaire survey was carried out in Taiwan from June to August 2000 with a sample of 350 hypertensive adults. The study population was aged 20 years old and above with a diagnosis of hypertension in Taiwan. The study samples was derived from two institutes: the National Taiwan University Hospital in Taipei urban area and the Jin-Shan Health Station in Taipei rural area. Variables: The variables to be considered are: 1. Six behaviors associated with hypertension control: Diet, Alcohol use, Smoking, Physical activity, Weight control, and Blood pressure checkups. 2. Demographic variables: Location: urban/rural, Age, Gender, Marriage status, Education, Income, Occupation, and Health resources. 3. Stages of change: Precontemplation, Contemplation, Preparation, Action, and Maintenance. 4. Processes of change: Consciousness Raising, Dramatic Relief, Environmental Reevaluation, Self-Reevaluation, Self-Liberation, Reinforcement Management, Helping Relationships, Counterconditioning, Stimulus Control, and Social Liberation. Methods: Hypertensive adults were randomly selected from the patients' medical records, but a convenient sample method was used to gather sufficient sample sizes also. Each study subject received an introductory letter and a self-administered questionnaire via mail or face-to-face interview. Those who failed to return these forms in two weeks were contacted by telephone. All participants in this study were entirely voluntary without any incentives offered to respondents. The questionnaires were adopted from the measurements- stage of change assessment for ten problem behaviors (CPRC, 1991). The questionnaire was translated to Chinese version, evaluated by two experts, and conducted by a pretest. To ascertain the reliability of the process of change scale, a Cronbach's Alpha was calculated. It yielded a value above 0.85 among ten processes of change with five level scales (never to often). Findings: The results showed that rural populations had more difficulties than urban populations in avoiding smoking and engaging in physical activity, and the processes of change being used by urban populations were significantly greater than rural populations. Among ten processes of change, counterconditioning, which is the substitution of alternatives for the problem behaviors, significantly helped people to change diet, engage in physical activity, and check blood pressure regularly. For example, counterconditioning is eating more vegetables instead of meat, or engaging in physical activity as a time to relax rather than another task to accomplish. In addition, self-reevaluation was the most important process for helping people to engage in physical activity; and social liberation was the most important process for changing diet behavior. Conclusions: The study findings support a strong association between processes and stages of change. Individuals who use more processes of change will be more inclined to move from precontemplation stage to maintenance stage. Implications: The results of this study may contribute to the improvements in existing health promotion programs for hypertension control in Taiwan by providing stage-tailed methods and strategies from the processes of behavioral change at the rural and the urban community.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHypertension Control and Related Variables among Urban and Rural Adults in Taiwanen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151854-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hypertension Control and Related Variables among Urban and Rural Adults in Taiwan</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chang, Luna</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Fooyin Institute of Technology</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lunachang@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: In the past decades, literature on hypertension treatment has demonstrated that a healthy lifestyle is one of the best strategies for hypertension control. However, only using the communication of health information is not enough to change people's lifestyle effectively. As recently the health institutes in Taiwan applied different media and health promotion methods to provide people health knowledge, it still could not completely influence the community population. In order to design a more effective health promotion program on hypertension control, the objective of this study is to explore the mechanisms of behavioral change by the application of a health behavioral theory. Design: This project was a cross-sectional study and applied the Transtheoretical Model to assess six health behaviors among hypertensive adults by a mail, telephone and face to face survey. Six health behaviors included a reduced fat diet, alcohol use, smoking, weight control, physical activity and blood pressure checkups. Different processes and stages of change for these six health behaviors were compared between rural and urban study population. Then, the processes of behavior change were used as independent variables to determine the outcome- stages of behavior change. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A questionnaire survey was carried out in Taiwan from June to August 2000 with a sample of 350 hypertensive adults. The study population was aged 20 years old and above with a diagnosis of hypertension in Taiwan. The study samples was derived from two institutes: the National Taiwan University Hospital in Taipei urban area and the Jin-Shan Health Station in Taipei rural area. Variables: The variables to be considered are: 1. Six behaviors associated with hypertension control: Diet, Alcohol use, Smoking, Physical activity, Weight control, and Blood pressure checkups. 2. Demographic variables: Location: urban/rural, Age, Gender, Marriage status, Education, Income, Occupation, and Health resources. 3. Stages of change: Precontemplation, Contemplation, Preparation, Action, and Maintenance. 4. Processes of change: Consciousness Raising, Dramatic Relief, Environmental Reevaluation, Self-Reevaluation, Self-Liberation, Reinforcement Management, Helping Relationships, Counterconditioning, Stimulus Control, and Social Liberation. Methods: Hypertensive adults were randomly selected from the patients' medical records, but a convenient sample method was used to gather sufficient sample sizes also. Each study subject received an introductory letter and a self-administered questionnaire via mail or face-to-face interview. Those who failed to return these forms in two weeks were contacted by telephone. All participants in this study were entirely voluntary without any incentives offered to respondents. The questionnaires were adopted from the measurements- stage of change assessment for ten problem behaviors (CPRC, 1991). The questionnaire was translated to Chinese version, evaluated by two experts, and conducted by a pretest. To ascertain the reliability of the process of change scale, a Cronbach's Alpha was calculated. It yielded a value above 0.85 among ten processes of change with five level scales (never to often). Findings: The results showed that rural populations had more difficulties than urban populations in avoiding smoking and engaging in physical activity, and the processes of change being used by urban populations were significantly greater than rural populations. Among ten processes of change, counterconditioning, which is the substitution of alternatives for the problem behaviors, significantly helped people to change diet, engage in physical activity, and check blood pressure regularly. For example, counterconditioning is eating more vegetables instead of meat, or engaging in physical activity as a time to relax rather than another task to accomplish. In addition, self-reevaluation was the most important process for helping people to engage in physical activity; and social liberation was the most important process for changing diet behavior. Conclusions: The study findings support a strong association between processes and stages of change. Individuals who use more processes of change will be more inclined to move from precontemplation stage to maintenance stage. Implications: The results of this study may contribute to the improvements in existing health promotion programs for hypertension control in Taiwan by providing stage-tailed methods and strategies from the processes of behavioral change at the rural and the urban community.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:15:55Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:15:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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