2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151859
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Alcohol Use on Maternal-Fetal Attachment
Abstract:
The Effect of Alcohol Use on Maternal-Fetal Attachment
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Hillegas, Kathleen
P.I. Institution Name:Eastern Michigan University
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: To examine the effect of alcohol use on the development of maternal-fetal attachment (MFA) in pregnant women. Maternal-Fetal Attachment (MFA) is "...the extent to which women engage in behaviors that represent an affiliation and interaction with their unborn child" (p. 282, Cranley, 1981). Maternal-infant attachment (after birth) is adversely affected by maternal abuse of alcohol and other drugs. There has been a fourfold increase in frequent drinking in pregnant women from 1991 to 1995 (CDC, 1991; CDC, 1997). Maternal-fetal attachment (prior to the birth) can affect the development of attachment after birth. Identifying factors that may interfere with the development of maternal-fetal attachment may lead to improved assessment and interventions that promote attachment. Design: This study was a cross-sectional, descriptive survey. Population/Sample/Setting/Years: A purposive sample of 80 pregnant women was selected from a prenatal clinic in a mid-western hospital. Eligibility criteria were: 18 years or older, could read/write English, used alcohol in the past year and were 20 weeks of gestation or more. Data were collected from December 1999 to April, 2001. A Certificate of Confidentiality was obtained from National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). Variables: The variables were: maternal fetal attachment, risk drinking, preconceptual drinking, periconceptual drinking, past month drinking, depression, interpersonal violence, demographics and obstetrical variables. Methods: Data were collected using the following instruments: *Maternal Fetal Attachment Scale (MFAS), Cranley, 1981; *TWEAK (Tolerance, Worried, Eye-opener, Amnesia and K/Cut-down), Russell, 1994; *National Pregnancy & Health Survey Self Administered Questionnaire (NIDA, 1994); *Beck Depression Inventory II (Beck, Steer & Brown, 1996) and *Abuse Assessment Screen (AAS). Demographic data and obstetrical variables were collected from the prenatal record. Eligible prenatal clients were asked by staff nurses to take the survey during a prenatal visit. A letter of consent was signed which included notification of the Certificate of Confidentiality. Completed survey instruments were kept in a locked file cabinet. Participants were given a $10 K-Mart Cash Card for their participation. Data were analyzed with SPSS 10 for Mac. Analysis included descriptive statistics, correlation and multiple regression. Findings: Preliminary results, using descriptive statistics, correlation and regression demonstrated that 55 (69%) reported drinking 3 months preconceptually; of those,17 (23%) were frequent binge drinkers. Only 6 (7.7%) reported past month drinking while pregnant and 19 (26%) were periconceptual risk drinkers from the TWEAK. Fifty-three percent (10) of risk drinkers were more likely to have a history of abuse (chi-square=7.405; df=1; Phi coefficient=.346; p=.007). MFAS scores were negatively correlated with risk drinking (r=-.237; p=.031). Multiple regression with three factors (risk drinking, depression and education) accounted for a small, but statistically significant portion of the variance (R=.370; R2=.137; F=3.116; p=.033) in maternal fetal attachment. Conclusions: The stigma of being pregnant and using alcohol likely contributes to underreporting of use. Use of a tool such as TWEAK for assessment of alcohol use during pregnancy helps to more accurately identify periconceptual risk drinkers. Implications: These findings are relevant to nurses because these factors (risk drinking, depression and education) can increase the ability to predict maternal-fetal attachment.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Alcohol Use on Maternal-Fetal Attachmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151859-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Alcohol Use on Maternal-Fetal Attachment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hillegas, Kathleen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Eastern Michigan University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nur_hillegas@online.emich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To examine the effect of alcohol use on the development of maternal-fetal attachment (MFA) in pregnant women. Maternal-Fetal Attachment (MFA) is &quot;...the extent to which women engage in behaviors that represent an affiliation and interaction with their unborn child&quot; (p. 282, Cranley, 1981). Maternal-infant attachment (after birth) is adversely affected by maternal abuse of alcohol and other drugs. There has been a fourfold increase in frequent drinking in pregnant women from 1991 to 1995 (CDC, 1991; CDC, 1997). Maternal-fetal attachment (prior to the birth) can affect the development of attachment after birth. Identifying factors that may interfere with the development of maternal-fetal attachment may lead to improved assessment and interventions that promote attachment. Design: This study was a cross-sectional, descriptive survey. Population/Sample/Setting/Years: A purposive sample of 80 pregnant women was selected from a prenatal clinic in a mid-western hospital. Eligibility criteria were: 18 years or older, could read/write English, used alcohol in the past year and were 20 weeks of gestation or more. Data were collected from December 1999 to April, 2001. A Certificate of Confidentiality was obtained from National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). Variables: The variables were: maternal fetal attachment, risk drinking, preconceptual drinking, periconceptual drinking, past month drinking, depression, interpersonal violence, demographics and obstetrical variables. Methods: Data were collected using the following instruments: *Maternal Fetal Attachment Scale (MFAS), Cranley, 1981; *TWEAK (Tolerance, Worried, Eye-opener, Amnesia and K/Cut-down), Russell, 1994; *National Pregnancy &amp; Health Survey Self Administered Questionnaire (NIDA, 1994); *Beck Depression Inventory II (Beck, Steer &amp; Brown, 1996) and *Abuse Assessment Screen (AAS). Demographic data and obstetrical variables were collected from the prenatal record. Eligible prenatal clients were asked by staff nurses to take the survey during a prenatal visit. A letter of consent was signed which included notification of the Certificate of Confidentiality. Completed survey instruments were kept in a locked file cabinet. Participants were given a $10 K-Mart Cash Card for their participation. Data were analyzed with SPSS 10 for Mac. Analysis included descriptive statistics, correlation and multiple regression. Findings: Preliminary results, using descriptive statistics, correlation and regression demonstrated that 55 (69%) reported drinking 3 months preconceptually; of those,17 (23%) were frequent binge drinkers. Only 6 (7.7%) reported past month drinking while pregnant and 19 (26%) were periconceptual risk drinkers from the TWEAK. Fifty-three percent (10) of risk drinkers were more likely to have a history of abuse (chi-square=7.405; df=1; Phi coefficient=.346; p=.007). MFAS scores were negatively correlated with risk drinking (r=-.237; p=.031). Multiple regression with three factors (risk drinking, depression and education) accounted for a small, but statistically significant portion of the variance (R=.370; R2=.137; F=3.116; p=.033) in maternal fetal attachment. Conclusions: The stigma of being pregnant and using alcohol likely contributes to underreporting of use. Use of a tool such as TWEAK for assessment of alcohol use during pregnancy helps to more accurately identify periconceptual risk drinkers. Implications: These findings are relevant to nurses because these factors (risk drinking, depression and education) can increase the ability to predict maternal-fetal attachment.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:16:04Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:16:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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