Association of Body Mass Index, Stages of Change, Alcohol Consumption, and Consequences of Drinking in College Freshman

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151882
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Association of Body Mass Index, Stages of Change, Alcohol Consumption, and Consequences of Drinking in College Freshman
Abstract:
Association of Body Mass Index, Stages of Change, Alcohol Consumption, and Consequences of Drinking in College Freshman
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2010
Author:Nies, Mary A., PhD, RN, FAAN, FAAHB
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Title:Carol Grotnes Belk Endowed Chair in Nursing & Professor
Co-Authors:Linman Sun, ; Donna Kazemi, PhD; Amy Carriker, BSN; Jacek Dmochowski, PhD
21st INRC [Evidence-Based Practice Presentation] Purpose: This study assessed the relationship between body mass index (BMI), stages of change, number of drinks, and consequences of drinking in college freshman. Research on association between body mass index and drinking is needed to better understand alcohol risk reduction and health promotion strategies in this vulnerable population. Health promotion concepts frame the study. Methods: College freshman (N=199) at a university, completed the Drinking Questionnaire, The Brief Readiness to Change Questionnaire (RCQ) and the Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index (RAPI). Drinking amount and RAPI served as outcomes and BMI was the independent variable. Multiple regression was used to assess association between outcomes and BMI with adjustments for gender and RCQ. Results: 39% of participants were females, 54.2% were in pre-contemplation, 14.3% in contemplation, and 31.5% in active stage. Average BMI was 24 kg/m2, participants consumed 13.5 drinks per week, and mean RAPI scores were 11 on the 0-69 scale. Drinking was associated with gender, BMI and RCQ (p<0.0001). For males pre-contemplating change, relation between BMI and amount of drinking was non-linear. Participants with average BMI drank the least (about 12 drinks per week), with the largest BMI the most (almost 50 drinks) while participants with lowest BMI in between (about 21 drinks). RAPI scores were associated with gender, amount of drinking and BMI (p<0.001, F=13.44). Increase of RAPI was larger for females (slope= 0.06) than for males (slope= 0.03). Participants with large BMI had lower RAPI scores. Conclusion: This information can be helpful when providing health promotion strategies to college students regarding nutrition modifications that would be most beneficial for their health.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssociation of Body Mass Index, Stages of Change, Alcohol Consumption, and Consequences of Drinking in College Freshmanen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151882-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Association of Body Mass Index, Stages of Change, Alcohol Consumption, and Consequences of Drinking in College Freshman</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nies, Mary A., PhD, RN, FAAN, FAAHB</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Carolina at Charlotte</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Carol Grotnes Belk Endowed Chair in Nursing &amp; Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mnies@uncc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linman Sun, ; Donna Kazemi, PhD; Amy Carriker, BSN; Jacek Dmochowski, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">21st INRC [Evidence-Based Practice Presentation] Purpose: This study assessed the relationship between body mass index (BMI), stages of change, number of drinks, and consequences of drinking in college freshman. Research on association between body mass index and drinking is needed to better understand alcohol risk reduction and health promotion strategies in this vulnerable population. Health promotion concepts frame the study. Methods: College freshman (N=199) at a university, completed the Drinking Questionnaire, The Brief Readiness to Change Questionnaire (RCQ) and the Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index (RAPI). Drinking amount and RAPI served as outcomes and BMI was the independent variable. Multiple regression was used to assess association between outcomes and BMI with adjustments for gender and RCQ. Results: 39% of participants were females, 54.2% were in pre-contemplation, 14.3% in contemplation, and 31.5% in active stage. Average BMI was 24 kg/m2, participants consumed 13.5 drinks per week, and mean RAPI scores were 11 on the 0-69 scale. Drinking was associated with gender, BMI and RCQ (p&lt;0.0001). For males pre-contemplating change, relation between BMI and amount of drinking was non-linear. Participants with average BMI drank the least (about 12 drinks per week), with the largest BMI the most (almost 50 drinks) while participants with lowest BMI in between (about 21 drinks). RAPI scores were associated with gender, amount of drinking and BMI (p&lt;0.001, F=13.44). Increase of RAPI was larger for females (slope= 0.06) than for males (slope= 0.03). Participants with large BMI had lower RAPI scores. Conclusion: This information can be helpful when providing health promotion strategies to college students regarding nutrition modifications that would be most beneficial for their health.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:16:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:16:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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