2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151914
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Power of Simulation on Graduate Nurses Transitioning to Staff Nurses Role
Abstract:
Power of Simulation on Graduate Nurses Transitioning to Staff Nurses Role
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Belay, Hanna A., MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital
Title:Education Specialist
Co-Authors:Judy Ong Ho MSN, RN, ACNS-BC, CPHQ, Education Specialist
Eddyline R. Comia MAN, RN, Nursing Laboratory Administrator
[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Evidence-based Practice Symposium Presentation] Simulation has been used in healthcare education since the beginning of formalized education (Bradley, 2006). Simulating a real world situation creates a non-threatening environment in which mistakes turn into learning opportunities (Broussard, Myers, & Lemoine, 2009; Beyea, Von Reyn, & Slattery, 2007). However, creating a simulated learning environment using today?s educational technology can be a costly endeavor. Research to support simulation as an effective strategy remains sparse. There is limited evidence available to justify the cost and effort involved in simulation and to make decisions related to the use simulation.  There is limited evidence in the literature regarding the outcomes of simulation when applied to staff nurses.  
Therefore, a collaborative research study was developed between a university's college of nursing and a magnet hospital to share technology and teaching expertise. Medium (computer assisted instruction) and high fidelity (interactive computerized manikins) simulation scenarios at the nursing program's laboratory were used to enhance the new graduate nurses' critical thinking skills. Clinical reasoning was measured using the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT) and Performance Based Development System (PBDS). The Casey Fink Graduate Nurse Experience survey (CF) tool was used to assess the graduate nurse's perception of skill development and support. This presentation provides insight into the literature review findings, the selection of the simulated learning tools, and the instruments used to measure the new graduate's clinical reasoning and confidence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePower of Simulation on Graduate Nurses Transitioning to Staff Nurses Roleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151914-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Power of Simulation on Graduate Nurses Transitioning to Staff Nurses Role</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Belay, Hanna A., MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Education Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hbelay@sleh.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judy Ong Ho MSN, RN, ACNS-BC, CPHQ, Education Specialist<br/>Eddyline R. Comia MAN, RN, Nursing Laboratory Administrator</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Evidence-based Practice Symposium Presentation] Simulation has been used in healthcare education since the beginning of formalized education (Bradley, 2006). Simulating a real world situation creates a non-threatening environment in which mistakes turn into learning opportunities (Broussard, Myers, &amp; Lemoine, 2009; Beyea, Von Reyn, &amp; Slattery, 2007). However, creating a simulated learning environment using today?s educational technology can be a costly endeavor. Research to support simulation as an effective strategy remains sparse. There is limited evidence available to justify the cost and effort involved in simulation and to make decisions related to the use simulation.&nbsp; There is limited evidence in the literature regarding the outcomes of simulation when applied to staff nurses. &nbsp; <br/>Therefore, a collaborative research study was developed between a university's college of nursing and a magnet hospital to share technology and teaching expertise. Medium (computer assisted instruction) and high fidelity (interactive computerized manikins) simulation scenarios at the nursing program's laboratory were used to enhance the new graduate nurses' critical thinking skills. Clinical reasoning was measured using the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT) and Performance Based Development System (PBDS). The Casey Fink Graduate Nurse Experience survey (CF) tool was used to assess the graduate nurse's perception of skill development and support. This presentation provides insight into the literature review findings, the selection of the simulated learning tools, and the instruments used to measure the new graduate's clinical reasoning and confidence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:17:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:17:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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