Motivational Interviewing with Middle School Girls to Explore Cognitions and Affect Related to Physical Activity

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151919
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Motivational Interviewing with Middle School Girls to Explore Cognitions and Affect Related to Physical Activity
Abstract:
Motivational Interviewing with Middle School Girls to Explore Cognitions and Affect Related to Physical Activity
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Burritt, Karen Roberts, MSN, RN, FNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:Doctoral Student
Co-Authors:Susan Wehner MSN, RN, FNP-BC, Doctoral Student
Lorraine B. Robbins PhD, RN, FNP-BC, Assistant Professor
Karin A. Pfeiffer PhD, Assistant Professor
[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Problem: Heightened awareness of the deleterious health outcomes arising from low levels of physical activity (PA) among adolescent girls has received attention.  Motivational interviewing has been successful for improving various health-related behaviors among adolescents. Its use for promoting moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) among girls of middle-school age has not been well-described. Framework: The cognitive and affective variables of the Health Promotion Model guided an intervention including three motivational interviewing sessions. Aims: 1) Discuss behavior-specific cognitions and affect that influence middle school girls' MVPA participation. 2) Describe changes in behavior-specific cognitions and affect that occur in successive motivational interviewing sessions. Method/Design: Fourteen racially diverse, low-active girls participated in a 6-month intervention to increase their MVPA.  Girls participated in three motivational interviewing sessions conducted during the school day at months 1, 3 and 5 and had an opportunity to participate in an after-school PA program. Analysis/Findings:  Analysis was conducted using Atlas ti (ver. 5). Thematic coding was performed on the transcripts of the motivation interviewing sessions (n = 42). Girls' perceived benefits of PA, barriers to PA, and PA self-efficacy, as well as affective, interpersonal , and situational influences on their PA, were identified.  Changes in the girls' cognitions and affect occurred with each successive session. Although all girls were able to identify benefits to MVPA, few (14.3%) participated in MVPA outside the school-based intervention. Barriers to participation were categorized into the following themes: "transportation," "conflicts" and "obligations."  Positive interpersonal influence from a parent was important.  Over time, the girls continued to identify numerous benefits of MVPA, but still reported difficulty overcoming some barriers.  They also reported "satisfaction" from increasing their PA.
Implications/Conclusions: Among low-SES middle school girls, parental support and barriers to PA, particularly social obligations and lack of transportation, must be considered when designing interventions aimed at increasing MVPA.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMotivational Interviewing with Middle School Girls to Explore Cognitions and Affect Related to Physical Activityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151919-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Motivational Interviewing with Middle School Girls to Explore Cognitions and Affect Related to Physical Activity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Burritt, Karen Roberts, MSN, RN, FNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">burrittk@msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan Wehner MSN, RN, FNP-BC, Doctoral Student<br/>Lorraine B. Robbins PhD, RN, FNP-BC, Assistant Professor<br/>Karin A. Pfeiffer PhD, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Problem: Heightened awareness of the deleterious health outcomes arising from low levels of physical activity (PA) among adolescent girls has received attention.&nbsp; Motivational interviewing has been successful for improving various health-related behaviors among adolescents. Its use for promoting moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA)&nbsp;among girls of middle-school age has not been well-described. Framework: The cognitive and affective variables of the Health Promotion Model guided an intervention including three motivational interviewing sessions. Aims: 1) Discuss behavior-specific cognitions and affect that influence middle school girls' MVPA participation. 2) Describe changes in behavior-specific cognitions and affect that occur in successive motivational interviewing sessions. Method/Design: Fourteen racially diverse, low-active girls participated in a 6-month intervention to increase their MVPA.&nbsp; Girls participated in three motivational interviewing sessions conducted during the school day at months 1, 3 and 5 and had an opportunity to participate in an after-school PA program. Analysis/Findings:&nbsp; Analysis was conducted using Atlas ti (ver. 5). Thematic coding was performed on the transcripts of the motivation interviewing sessions (n = 42). Girls' perceived benefits of PA, barriers to PA, and PA self-efficacy, as well as affective, interpersonal , and situational influences on their PA, were identified.&nbsp; Changes in the girls' cognitions and affect occurred with each successive session. Although all girls were able to identify benefits to MVPA, few (14.3%) participated in MVPA outside the school-based intervention. Barriers to participation were categorized into the following themes: &quot;transportation,&quot; &quot;conflicts&quot; and &quot;obligations.&quot;&nbsp; Positive interpersonal influence from a parent was important.&nbsp; Over time, the girls continued to identify numerous benefits of MVPA, but still reported difficulty overcoming some barriers.&nbsp; They also reported &quot;satisfaction&quot; from increasing their PA. <br/>Implications/Conclusions: Among low-SES middle school girls, parental support and barriers to PA, particularly social obligations and lack of transportation, must be considered when designing interventions aimed at increasing MVPA.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:18:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:18:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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