Systematic Review of Nurse-Led Experimental Studies of Self-Management Interventions for Chronic Illness

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151932
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Systematic Review of Nurse-Led Experimental Studies of Self-Management Interventions for Chronic Illness
Abstract:
Systematic Review of Nurse-Led Experimental Studies of Self-Management Interventions for Chronic Illness
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Dickson, Victoria Vaughan, PhD, RN, CRNP
P.I. Institution Name:New York University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Marilyn Hammer PhD, DC, RN, Assistant Professor
Kelley Newlin ANP, Assistant Professor
Elizabeth Ercolano RN, Assistant Professor
Jill Nocella MSN, RN, Doctoral Student
Deborah Chyun PhD, RN, Associate Professor
Gail D'Eramo Melkus EdD, C-NP, FAAN, Floren
[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Purpose:  Interventions facilitating chronic illness knowledge and skill behaviors for patients [often who have more than one common condition - diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer)] are referred to as self-management, self-care, or symptom management interventions, respectively. The extent to which interventions, developed and tested by nurse scientists share common operational definitions and methods is not well known. This integrative review sought to: 1) determine the extent of nurse-directed "self-management" intervention studies; 2) analyze evidence for common definitions and intervention methods; and 3) determine evidence for effectiveness of interventions based on unique program attributes. Methods:  A systematic integrative review based on PRISMA guidelines examined the conceptual basis, operational definition, methods, and outcomes of "self-management" in nurse-directed experimental and quasi-experimental studies in the diabetes, CVD, and oncology literature, years 2000-2010. Data from 139 studies meeting specific inclusion criteria were coded based on: (1) population; (2) conceptual framework; (3) design; (4) intervention components; (5) measures; and (6) outcomes with a categorization scheme generated. Data analysis included identification of categorical patterns across studies. Results:  A variety of interventions have been tested in these populations; bundled interventions were most common (40%). Only 20% of the intervention studies targeted ethnic minorities and few were guided by conceptual frameworks. Outcomes and effectiveness varied widely. Diabetes self-management interventions examined physiological measures (i.e., HbA1C) with significantly improved outcomes. CVD self-care interventions measured effect on quality of life with mixed results that lacked sustainability over time. Effective cancer interventions focused on symptom management through the use of exercise for treatment-related fatigue. Conclusion: Currently, there is insufficient evidence to support adoption of generic chronic illness self-management guidelines. Research is needed to better understand the effect of specific intervention components of bundled interventions on outcomes with guiding conceptual frameworks.  Development and testing of culturally relevant self-management interventions is critically needed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSystematic Review of Nurse-Led Experimental Studies of Self-Management Interventions for Chronic Illnessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151932-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Systematic Review of Nurse-Led Experimental Studies of Self-Management Interventions for Chronic Illness</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dickson, Victoria Vaughan, PhD, RN, CRNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">New York University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vdickson@nyu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marilyn Hammer PhD, DC, RN, Assistant Professor<br/>Kelley Newlin ANP, Assistant Professor<br/>Elizabeth Ercolano RN, Assistant Professor<br/>Jill Nocella MSN, RN, Doctoral Student<br/>Deborah Chyun PhD, RN, Associate Professor<br/>Gail D'Eramo Melkus EdD, C-NP, FAAN, Floren</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Purpose: &nbsp;Interventions facilitating chronic illness knowledge and skill behaviors for patients [often who have more than one common condition - diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer)] are referred to as self-management, self-care, or symptom management interventions, respectively. The extent to which interventions, developed and tested by nurse scientists share common operational definitions and methods is not well known. This integrative review sought to: 1) determine the extent of nurse-directed &quot;self-management&quot; intervention studies; 2) analyze evidence for common definitions and intervention methods; and 3) determine evidence for effectiveness of interventions based on unique program attributes. Methods:&nbsp;&nbsp;A systematic integrative review based on PRISMA guidelines examined the conceptual basis, operational definition, methods, and outcomes of &quot;self-management&quot; in nurse-directed experimental and quasi-experimental studies in the diabetes, CVD, and oncology literature, years 2000-2010. Data from 139 studies meeting specific inclusion criteria were coded based on: (1) population; (2) conceptual framework; (3) design; (4) intervention components; (5) measures; and (6) outcomes with a categorization scheme generated. Data analysis included identification of categorical patterns across studies. Results:&nbsp;&nbsp;A variety of interventions have been tested in these populations; bundled interventions were most common (40%). Only 20% of the intervention studies targeted ethnic minorities and few were guided by conceptual frameworks. Outcomes and effectiveness varied widely. Diabetes self-management interventions examined physiological measures (i.e., HbA1C) with significantly improved outcomes. CVD self-care interventions measured effect on quality of life with mixed results that lacked sustainability over time. Effective cancer interventions focused on symptom management through the use of exercise for treatment-related fatigue. Conclusion:&nbsp;Currently, there is insufficient evidence to support adoption of generic chronic illness self-management guidelines. Research is needed to better understand the effect of specific intervention components of bundled interventions on outcomes with guiding conceptual frameworks. &nbsp;Development and testing of culturally relevant self-management interventions is critically needed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:18:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:18:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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