2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151934
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reflections of a Volunteer Nurse Practitioner in Vietnam and Cambodia
Abstract:
Reflections of a Volunteer Nurse Practitioner in Vietnam and Cambodia
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Fogg, Catherine J., PhD, ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Anselm College
Title:Associate Professor
[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Purpose:  The purpose of this paper is to describe the reflections of a six week experience while volunteering as a family nurse practitioner with the USNS Mercy in the villages of Vietnam and Cambodia.
Rational:  As our communities become more global, providing health care in impoverished countries is becoming more common place.  Many nurse volunteers are traveling to needy countries to provide health care; however, many of these volunteers may be unprepared for the health care inequalities they may face.  In this paper I share my reflections and experiences as I faced this moral disconnect.
Significance:  Providing health care in poverty-stricken countries can be a stressful experience and raise ethical dilemmas as to whether the small impact we have is of any consequence compared to the great need to which we are exposed.  Little is written in the literature to help volunteer nurses prepare for this type of experience. 
Methodology:  Personal reflections were recorded in a journal during a six week experience and then analyzed after the experience. 
Findings: 
"If I'm doing good, why do I feel so bad?"  Structural violence and social injustices cause conflicted emotions. 
"Is there any value in just a one month supply of vitamins or medicines?"  "What, if anything, is the value of our good deeds?" 
"We may not have any magic medicines, but we can have care and compassion!"
"Education is essential." 
"We can make a difference!"
Recommendations:  Nurses who provide global health care are in a great position to share their reflections with those who are planning such experiences.  Dialog regarding social injustices and ethical dilemmas related to inadequate health care in poverty-stricken countries need to become more common place so that nurses can continue to play a role in assisting needy global communities. 
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReflections of a Volunteer Nurse Practitioner in Vietnam and Cambodiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151934-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Reflections of a Volunteer Nurse Practitioner in Vietnam and Cambodia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fogg, Catherine J., PhD, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Anselm College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cfogg@anselm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Purpose:&nbsp; The purpose of this paper is to describe the reflections of a six week experience while volunteering as a family nurse practitioner with the USNS Mercy in the villages of Vietnam and Cambodia. <br/>Rational:&nbsp; As our communities become more global, providing health care in impoverished countries is becoming more common place.&nbsp; Many nurse volunteers are traveling to needy countries to provide health care; however, many of these volunteers may be unprepared for the health care inequalities they may face.&nbsp; In this paper I share my reflections and experiences as I faced this moral disconnect. <br/>Significance:&nbsp; Providing health care in poverty-stricken countries can be a stressful experience and raise ethical dilemmas as to whether the small impact we have is of any consequence compared to the great need to which we are exposed.&nbsp; Little is written in the literature to help volunteer nurses prepare for this type of experience.&nbsp; <br/>Methodology:&nbsp; Personal reflections were recorded in a journal during a six week experience and then analyzed after the experience.&nbsp; <br/>Findings:&nbsp; <br/>&quot;If I'm doing good, why do I feel so bad?&quot;&nbsp; Structural violence and social injustices cause conflicted emotions.&nbsp; <br/>&quot;Is there any value in just a one month supply of vitamins or medicines?&quot;&nbsp; &quot;What, if anything, is the value of our good deeds?&quot;&nbsp; <br/>&quot;We may not have any magic medicines, but we can have care and compassion!&quot; <br/>&quot;Education is essential.&quot;&nbsp; <br/>&quot;We can make a difference!&quot; <br/>Recommendations:&nbsp; Nurses who provide global health care are in a great position to share their reflections with those who are planning such experiences.&nbsp; Dialog regarding social injustices and ethical dilemmas related to inadequate health care in poverty-stricken countries need to become more common place so that nurses can continue to play a role in&nbsp;assisting&nbsp;needy global communities.&nbsp; <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:18:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:18:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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