Spiritual, Religious and Psychosocial Correlates of Adherence Among African-American HIV-Positive Outpatients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151936
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Spiritual, Religious and Psychosocial Correlates of Adherence Among African-American HIV-Positive Outpatients
Abstract:
Spiritual, Religious and Psychosocial Correlates of Adherence Among African-American HIV-Positive Outpatients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:George Dalmida, Safiya, PhD, MSN, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:Emory University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Harold Koenig MD, Professor
[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose: The aims of this study are to examine: (1) religious coping (RCOPE), depression, perceived stress, social support, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL); (2) differences in these mean scores between Blacks and non-Blacks; and (3) identify predictors of HIV medication adherence among HIV+ Blacks in a sample of 292 HIV+ outpatients from infectious disease clinics and AIDS Service Organizations in the southeastern US.
Methods:  A cross-sectional study with 292 HIV+ outpatients was conducted. SPSS 18.0 and one-way ANOVA, correlations and hierarchical regression statistics were used.
Results: : Majority of the sample were African-American/Black (90.1%, n=262) and 6.2% were Caucasian. Majority were unemployed/on disability (90.8%) and impoverished (75.7% income<$11,000/year). Sample means: age=45 years; depression=19.3±12.8; HIV medication adherence=24±.25.9 (higher scores= better adherence on 0-30 scale); and CD4 count=452.5±335.58 cells/µL. Mean negative RCOPE was 4.86±5.34 and positive was 16.6±5.06 (higher scores=more coping on 0-21 scale). HIV+ Blacks had significantly higher mean total RCOPE (p=.035), positive RCOPE (p=.033), and social support satisfaction (p=.004) scores than HIV+ non-Blacks. There were no significant mean differences in number of years in HIV care, HIV medication adherence, depression, perceived stress, or HRQOL. Among HIV+ Blacks, HIV medication adherence was significantly inversely associated with depression (r= -.29; p=.000), perceived stress (r= -.33; p=.000) and significantly positively associated with positive RCOPE (r=.13; p=.04), social support satisfaction (r=.31; p=.000), mental HRQOL (r=.30; p=.000), physical HRQOL (r=.18; p=.009). Among HIV+ Blacks, Negative RCOPE, social support satisfaction, and years in HIV care were the only significant predictors of HIV medication adherence, controlling for socio-demographics.
Conclusion: HIV+ Blacks reported greater religious coping and satisfaction with social support than HIV+ non-Blacks. However, among HIV+ Blacks, negative forms of religious coping may negatively impact HIV medication adherence and greater satisfaction with social support and prolonged/consistent engagement in HIV care may positively impact HIV medication adherence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpiritual, Religious and Psychosocial Correlates of Adherence Among African-American HIV-Positive Outpatientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151936-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Spiritual, Religious and Psychosocial Correlates of Adherence Among African-American HIV-Positive Outpatients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">George Dalmida, Safiya, PhD, MSN, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Emory University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sageorg@emory.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Harold Koenig MD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose:&nbsp;The aims of this study are to examine: (1) religious coping (RCOPE), depression, perceived stress, social support, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL); (2) differences in these mean scores between Blacks and non-Blacks; and (3) identify predictors of HIV medication adherence among HIV+ Blacks in a sample of 292 HIV+ outpatients from infectious disease clinics and AIDS Service Organizations in the southeastern US. <br/>Methods:&nbsp;&nbsp;A cross-sectional study with 292 HIV+ outpatients was conducted. SPSS 18.0 and one-way ANOVA, correlations and hierarchical regression statistics were used. <br/>Results:&nbsp;: Majority of the sample were African-American/Black (90.1%, n=262) and 6.2% were Caucasian. Majority were unemployed/on disability (90.8%) and impoverished (75.7% income&lt;$11,000/year). Sample means: age=45 years; depression=19.3&plusmn;12.8; HIV medication adherence=24&plusmn;.25.9 (higher scores= better adherence on 0-30 scale); and CD4 count=452.5&plusmn;335.58 cells/&micro;L. Mean negative RCOPE was 4.86&plusmn;5.34 and positive was 16.6&plusmn;5.06 (higher scores=more coping on 0-21 scale). HIV+ Blacks had significantly higher mean total RCOPE (p=.035), positive RCOPE (p=.033), and social support satisfaction (p=.004) scores than HIV+ non-Blacks. There were no significant mean differences in number of years in HIV care, HIV medication adherence, depression, perceived stress, or HRQOL. Among HIV+ Blacks, HIV medication adherence was significantly inversely associated with depression (r= -.29; p=.000), perceived stress (r= -.33; p=.000) and significantly positively associated with positive RCOPE (r=.13; p=.04), social support satisfaction (r=.31; p=.000), mental HRQOL (r=.30; p=.000), physical HRQOL (r=.18; p=.009). Among HIV+ Blacks, Negative RCOPE, social support satisfaction, and years in HIV care were the only significant predictors of HIV medication adherence, controlling for socio-demographics. <br/>Conclusion:&nbsp;HIV+ Blacks reported greater religious coping and satisfaction with social support than HIV+ non-Blacks. However, among HIV+ Blacks, negative forms of religious coping may negatively impact HIV medication adherence and greater satisfaction with social support and prolonged/consistent engagement in HIV care may positively impact HIV medication adherence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:18:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:18:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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