Maintaining Participation and Momentum in a Longitudinal Research Study of High Risk Families

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151937
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maintaining Participation and Momentum in a Longitudinal Research Study of High Risk Families
Abstract:
Maintaining Participation and Momentum in a Longitudinal Research Study of High Risk Families
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Graziotti, Ann L., MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Miami
Title:ARNP/Study Coordinator
[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Background: Maintaining ongoing participation of study subjects is a critical element of any successful longitudinal study. Factors such as poverty and substance use may contribute to unstable living situations or unreliable contact information that make adequate compliance difficult to achieve.
Objective: The purpose of the current study was to identify strategies for maintenance of a cohort and recovery of study participants following a period of subject dropout.
Design/Methods: The Maternal Lifestyle Study (MLS) investigates the effects of prenatal substance exposure (cocaine/opiates) on child outcome in a longitudinal follow-up of 1,388 children, an exposed group (n = 658) and a nonexposed group (n = 730), from birth through 13 years of age. Retention of study subjects and factors that could impact compliance were examined over the course of four follow-up phases.
Results: Mothers in the exposed group were older, less educated, unmarried and used alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana more often. They more often received Medicaid and had incomes below the federal poverty guideline. Overall study retention showed a marked drop from 79% at the 3-year visit to 65% at the 4½-year visit. Multiple strategies that sought to reengage and maintain subjects in the study included flexibility with scheduling, home visits, long-distance trips, increased incentives, and development of a computerized tracking system. At the conclusion of the 13-year visits, MLS successfully improved compliance to 76%. Retention rates did not differ by exposure group.
Discussion: Multiple factors, such as diligence, persistence, flexibility, and establishing rapport with families, contribute to overall participant retention. The use of multiple tracking techniques is essential.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaintaining Participation and Momentum in a Longitudinal Research Study of High Risk Familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151937-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Maintaining Participation and Momentum in a Longitudinal Research Study of High Risk Families</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Graziotti, Ann L., MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Miami</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">ARNP/Study Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">agraziotti@med.miami.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Background: Maintaining ongoing participation of study subjects is a critical element of any successful longitudinal study. Factors such as poverty and substance use may contribute to unstable living situations or unreliable contact information that make adequate compliance difficult to achieve. <br/>Objective: The purpose of the current study was to identify strategies for maintenance of a cohort and recovery of study participants following a period of subject dropout. <br/>Design/Methods: The Maternal Lifestyle Study (MLS) investigates the effects of prenatal substance exposure (cocaine/opiates) on child outcome in a longitudinal follow-up of 1,388 children, an exposed group (n = 658) and a nonexposed group (n = 730), from birth through 13 years of age. Retention of study subjects and factors that could impact compliance were examined over the course of four follow-up phases. <br/>Results: Mothers in the exposed group were older, less educated, unmarried and used alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana more often. They more often received Medicaid and had incomes below the federal poverty guideline. Overall study retention showed a marked drop from 79% at the 3-year visit to 65% at the 4&frac12;-year visit. Multiple strategies that sought to reengage and maintain subjects in the study included flexibility with scheduling, home visits, long-distance trips, increased incentives, and development of a computerized tracking system. At the conclusion of the 13-year visits, MLS successfully improved compliance to 76%. Retention rates did not differ by exposure group. <br/>Discussion: Multiple factors, such as diligence, persistence, flexibility, and establishing rapport with families, contribute to overall participant retention. The use of multiple tracking techniques is essential.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:18:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:18:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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