2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/151967
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Student curricular planning and affects on student learning
Abstract:
Student curricular planning and affects on student learning
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:McAdams-Jones, Dianne, EdD, RN, GNE
P.I. Institution Name:Utah Valley University
Title:Assistant Researcher
[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose:  To explore the student?s perceptions of their preferential learning styles and to determine if student involvement in the curriculum planning would alter these perceptions.  The targeted audience is faculty in higher education and the college student.
  Methods: A pre nursing class of seventy students was surveyed for perceptions of their learning preferences at the beginning of the semester and again at the end of the semester.   Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the survey and using NVivo software, thematic design in narrative research was used to identify perceptions of preferred learning styles.  Using David Kolb?s experiential learning theory where four stages of learning are developed thereby influencing learning choices in life, students were found to perceive they learn best when they see a procedure performed and are then allowed to perform the procedure themselves.  This is significant in learning because teaching styles which match preferred learning styles are beneficial to both teacher and learner.
   A former student ( student researcher) of this class determined methods of content delivery (teaching styles) which would address the students learning preferences.  The students were aware throughout the semester that the student researcher was involved in the curriculum planning for this course.
 Results: The perceived preferred learning style was demonstrative learning, 49/70. The student researcher formulated a template of lesson plans using demonstrative content delivery. Replacing traditional lecture with student and teacher engagement was implemented where concepts and skills were demonstrated by the students with return demonstrations from fellow classmates.
Ten students dropped the course. Of the sixty students provided the survey end of semester, forty-two students returned the survey.  The perceived preferred learning style was demonstrative, again, 32/42.
Conclusion: Students will repeat perceived helpful learning behaviors and faculty may want to match teaching strategies with student perceived preferred learning styles.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStudent curricular planning and affects on student learningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/151967-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Student curricular planning and affects on student learning</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McAdams-Jones, Dianne, EdD, RN, GNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Utah Valley University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Researcher</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dianne.mcadams-jones@uvu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose:&nbsp; To explore the student?s perceptions of their preferential learning styles and to determine if student involvement in the curriculum planning would alter these perceptions.&nbsp; The targeted audience is faculty in higher education and the college student. <br/>&nbsp; Methods: A pre nursing class of seventy students was surveyed for perceptions of their learning preferences at the beginning of the semester and again at the end of the semester.&nbsp;&nbsp; Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the survey and using NVivo software, thematic design in narrative research was used to identify perceptions of preferred learning styles.&nbsp; Using David Kolb?s experiential learning theory where four stages of learning are developed thereby influencing learning choices in life, students were found to perceive they learn best when they see a procedure performed and are then allowed to perform the procedure themselves.&nbsp; This is significant in learning because teaching styles which match preferred learning styles are beneficial to both teacher and learner. <br/>&nbsp;&nbsp; A former student ( student researcher) of this class determined methods of content delivery (teaching styles) which would address the students learning preferences.&nbsp; The students were aware throughout the semester that the student researcher was involved in the curriculum planning for this course. <br/>&nbsp;Results: The perceived preferred learning style was demonstrative learning, 49/70. The student researcher formulated a template of lesson plans using demonstrative content delivery. Replacing traditional lecture with student and teacher engagement was implemented where concepts and skills were demonstrated by the students with return demonstrations from fellow classmates. <br/>Ten students dropped the course. Of the sixty students provided the survey end of semester, forty-two students returned the survey.&nbsp; The perceived preferred learning style was demonstrative, again, 32/42. <br/>Conclusion: Students will repeat perceived helpful learning behaviors and faculty may want to match teaching strategies with student perceived preferred learning styles.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:19:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:19:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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