Heart Rate Variability and Daytime Functioning in Insomniacs and Normal Sleepers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152010
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Heart Rate Variability and Daytime Functioning in Insomniacs and Normal Sleepers
Abstract:
Heart Rate Variability and Daytime Functioning in Insomniacs and Normal Sleepers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2008
Author:Tsai, Pei-Shan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Taipei Medical University
Title:Associate Professor
[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Objectives: This study examined the differences in heart rate variability (HRV) and daytime functioning between insomniacs and normal sleepers. Methods: All participants underwent an interview, a medical examination, and a sleep measurement protocol during which they wore an actigraph and logged a sleep diary for a 7-day period to verify their eligibility. Included in the study were 18 insomniacs and 21 normal sleepers. During a laboratory session, these participants completed 5 paper-pencil tests of sleepiness, anxiety, fatigue, and concentration difficulty, and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Resting HRV was recorded under paced breathing. Results: Neither did insomniacs experience cognitive impairment nor did they experience excessive daytime sleepiness compared with normal sleepers. However, insomniacs experienced higher frequency of fatigue (effect size [ES] =1.14, p = 0.002) compared with normal sleepers. There was a trend tower higher trait anxiety score (ES = 0.62) and concentration difficulty (ES = 0.59) in insomniacs than in normal sleepers. Although a trend toward lower resting high frequency (HF)-HRV (ES = -0.57) in insomniacs than in normal sleepers was noted, neither the resting low-frequency (LF)-HRV nor the LF/HF ratio were different between groups. Subjective sleep estimates correlated to self-reported daytime consequences such as fatigue and concentration difficulty but not cognitive function. On the contrary, objective sleep estimates correlated to problem-solving/conceptualization and learning but not self-reported daytime consequences. Conclusions: Insomniacs are not sleepier during the day than normal sleepers. However, they may experience daytime symptoms such as fatigue and concentration difficulty although cognitive function remains unimpaired.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHeart Rate Variability and Daytime Functioning in Insomniacs and Normal Sleepersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152010-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Heart Rate Variability and Daytime Functioning in Insomniacs and Normal Sleepers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tsai, Pei-Shan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Taipei Medical University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ptsai@tmu.edu.tw</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Objectives: This study examined the differences in heart rate variability (HRV) and daytime functioning between insomniacs and normal sleepers. Methods: All participants underwent an interview, a medical examination, and a sleep measurement protocol during which they wore an actigraph and logged a sleep diary for a 7-day period to verify their eligibility. Included in the study were 18 insomniacs and 21 normal sleepers. During a laboratory session, these participants completed 5 paper-pencil tests of sleepiness, anxiety, fatigue, and concentration difficulty, and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Resting HRV was recorded under paced breathing. Results: Neither did insomniacs experience cognitive impairment nor did they experience excessive daytime sleepiness compared with normal sleepers. However, insomniacs experienced higher frequency of fatigue (effect size [ES] =1.14, p = 0.002) compared with normal sleepers. There was a trend tower higher trait anxiety score (ES = 0.62) and concentration difficulty (ES = 0.59) in insomniacs than in normal sleepers. Although a trend toward lower resting high frequency (HF)-HRV (ES = -0.57) in insomniacs than in normal sleepers was noted, neither the resting low-frequency (LF)-HRV nor the LF/HF ratio were different between groups. Subjective sleep estimates correlated to self-reported daytime consequences such as fatigue and concentration difficulty but not cognitive function. On the contrary, objective sleep estimates correlated to problem-solving/conceptualization and learning but not self-reported daytime consequences. Conclusions: Insomniacs are not sleepier during the day than normal sleepers. However, they may experience daytime symptoms such as fatigue and concentration difficulty although cognitive function remains unimpaired.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:21:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:21:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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