Job Stress and Its Relationship with Intention to Quit of New Graduate Nurses during the First Three Months of Work in Taiwan

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152017
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Job Stress and Its Relationship with Intention to Quit of New Graduate Nurses during the First Three Months of Work in Taiwan
Abstract:
Job Stress and Its Relationship with Intention to Quit of New Graduate Nurses during the First Three Months of Work in Taiwan
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2008
Author:Yeh, Ming-Chen, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Instructor, School of Nursing, Hungkuang University
Title:PhD Student
Co-Authors:Shu Yu, PhD, RN; Hsing-Yi Yu, RN
[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] In the era of nursing shortage, remain new graduates in employment is crucial. Previous studies about job stress of new graduates were often from a qualitative perspective to yield an in-depth description. Quantitative studies were scarce, but also less specific in its relationships to quit. This study aims to investigate job stress perceived by new graduates and its relationships to intention to quit during the first three months of nursing practice. Factors influencing intention to quit were also examined. We conducted a cross-sectional research. New graduates' perceptions of job stress, intention to quit and relating factors during the first three months of work were measured by structured questionnaire in two levels of hospitals in middle Taiwan (N = 146, response rate 76%). Subjects experienced some stressful and 31.5% intended to quit during the first three months of work. Job stress in the dimension of task in critical care was much-to-extremely stressful persistently (>3.50). Hospital level, work independently, night shift, and working period had statistically effect on perceived intensity of job stress. At 1-2 month, the stay group perceived significantly less stress (t = 2.66, p = 0.011), especially in the dimensions of task in critical care (t = 2.84, p = 0.007), role and interpersonal relationships (t = 2.46, p = 0.016) and organizational structure and leadership (t = 2.48, p = 0.021), than the quit group. Job stress, hospital level, clinical practicum and age were significant predictors of intention to quit. In order to remain new graduates in employment, it is important to decrease their job stress especially in critical care and create a supporting work environment to diminish interpersonal conflict and to increase sense of belonging. The period of 1-2 month is a trigger point to intervene stress-alleviating program.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleJob Stress and Its Relationship with Intention to Quit of New Graduate Nurses during the First Three Months of Work in Taiwanen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152017-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Job Stress and Its Relationship with Intention to Quit of New Graduate Nurses during the First Three Months of Work in Taiwan</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yeh, Ming-Chen, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Instructor, School of Nursing, Hungkuang University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mcyeh@sunrise.hk.edu.tw</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Shu Yu, PhD, RN; Hsing-Yi Yu, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] In the era of nursing shortage, remain new graduates in employment is crucial. Previous studies about job stress of new graduates were often from a qualitative perspective to yield an in-depth description. Quantitative studies were scarce, but also less specific in its relationships to quit. This study aims to investigate job stress perceived by new graduates and its relationships to intention to quit during the first three months of nursing practice. Factors influencing intention to quit were also examined. We conducted a cross-sectional research. New graduates' perceptions of job stress, intention to quit and relating factors during the first three months of work were measured by structured questionnaire in two levels of hospitals in middle Taiwan (N = 146, response rate 76%). Subjects experienced some stressful and 31.5% intended to quit during the first three months of work. Job stress in the dimension of task in critical care was much-to-extremely stressful persistently (&gt;3.50). Hospital level, work independently, night shift, and working period had statistically effect on perceived intensity of job stress. At 1-2 month, the stay group perceived significantly less stress (t = 2.66, p = 0.011), especially in the dimensions of task in critical care (t = 2.84, p = 0.007), role and interpersonal relationships (t = 2.46, p = 0.016) and organizational structure and leadership (t = 2.48, p = 0.021), than the quit group. Job stress, hospital level, clinical practicum and age were significant predictors of intention to quit. In order to remain new graduates in employment, it is important to decrease their job stress especially in critical care and create a supporting work environment to diminish interpersonal conflict and to increase sense of belonging. The period of 1-2 month is a trigger point to intervene stress-alleviating program.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:21:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:21:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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