2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152028
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Survivorship Concerns in Women with Breast Cancer
Abstract:
Survivorship Concerns in Women with Breast Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Boehmke, Marcia M., DNS, RN, ANPc
P.I. Institution Name:University at Buffalo
Title:Research Assistant Professor
[Research Presentation] Background: Survivorships rates among women with breast cancer have steadily increased over the last decade.  While this is certainly a positive, women are often left with the scars of breast cancer and its treatment for years to come.  Insufficient research is available to identify what residual symptoms and emotional concerns affect women's quality of life and functioning. Purpose:  To determine the full scope of residual symptoms, symptom distress, and emotional/psychological concerns, women continue to experience long after treatment completion.  Methods:  This qualitative study was guide by Hermeneutic Phenomenology, that emphasizes the lived experience, holistically.  Women were asked to share their experiences after treatment completion.  Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed, and data analysis consisted of thematic analysis of the narratives.  Results:  Five themes emerged: physical & menopausal symptoms, cognitive impairment, uncertainty, aloneness, and fear for family.  As difficult as women found incorporating treatment for breast cancer into their already busy lives, they soon began to view the treatment as part of their "life routine" and appreciated the support of doctors, nurses, and fellow patients.  Once treatment was completed they felt alone and scared.   Conclusion: The life long consequences of treatment for breast cancer must be recognized and managed if survivors are to enjoy the lives they will go on to live.  Most health care providers are of the impression that women are glad when treatment is over, when indeed, often times they are not.  During treatment women develop relationships with both nurses and fellow patients and after treatment completion they feel alone or as one researcher described they feel as though they were "in a black hole."  This hole needs to be recognized and dealt with to ensure the quality of life of breast cancer survivors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSurvivorship Concerns in Women with Breast Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152028-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Survivorship Concerns in Women with Breast Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Boehmke, Marcia M., DNS, RN, ANPc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University at Buffalo</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">boehmke@buffalo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Background: Survivorships rates among women with breast cancer have steadily increased over the last decade.&nbsp; While this is certainly a positive, women are often left with the scars of breast cancer and its treatment for years to come.&nbsp; Insufficient research is available to identify what residual symptoms and emotional concerns affect women's quality of life and functioning. Purpose: &nbsp;To determine the full scope of residual symptoms, symptom distress, and emotional/psychological concerns, women continue to experience long after treatment completion.&nbsp; Methods: &nbsp;This qualitative study was guide by Hermeneutic Phenomenology, that emphasizes the lived experience, holistically.&nbsp; Women were asked to share their experiences after treatment completion.&nbsp; Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed, and data analysis consisted of thematic analysis of the narratives.&nbsp; Results: &nbsp;Five themes emerged: physical &amp; menopausal symptoms, cognitive impairment, uncertainty, aloneness, and fear for family.&nbsp; As difficult as women found incorporating treatment for breast cancer into their already busy lives, they soon began to view the treatment as part of their &quot;life routine&quot; and appreciated the support of doctors, nurses, and fellow patients.&nbsp; Once treatment was completed they felt alone and scared.&nbsp;&nbsp; Conclusion: The life long consequences of treatment for breast cancer must be recognized and managed if survivors are to enjoy the lives they will go on to live.&nbsp; Most health care providers are of the impression that women are glad when treatment is over, when indeed, often times they are not.&nbsp; During treatment women develop relationships with both nurses and fellow patients and after treatment completion they feel alone or as one researcher described they feel as though they were &quot;in a black hole.&quot;&nbsp; This hole needs to be recognized and dealt with to ensure the quality of life of breast cancer survivors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:21:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:21:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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