Assessment of Oral Mucositis in Adult and Pediatric Oncology Patients: An Evidence-Based Approach

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152040
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessment of Oral Mucositis in Adult and Pediatric Oncology Patients: An Evidence-Based Approach
Abstract:
Assessment of Oral Mucositis in Adult and Pediatric Oncology Patients: An Evidence-Based Approach
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Farrington, Michele, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics/University of Iowa Children's Hospital
Title:Staff Nurse
[Evidence-based Practice Session Presentation] Purpose:  To improve evidence-based nursing assessment of oral mucositis. Methods:  Patients describe oral mucositis as the most distressing side effect of cancer treatment (Jaroneski, 2006).  Oral mucositis is problematic, resulting in delayed treatments, reduced treatment dosages, altered nutrition, dehydration, infections, xerostomia, pain, and increased healthcare costs (Brown & Wingard, 2004; Sonis, et al., 2004).  After reviewing the evidence and comparing tools, Eilers' Oral Assessment Guide was chosen for clinical use as the oral mucositis assessment tool for all oncology patients and was piloted in September 2006.  The translational research model (Titler & Everett, 2001) was used to guide implementation of the evidence-based changes which included:  educating nursing and medical staff, outreach, developing a policy and procedure, modifying the computerized charting systems, and providing audit and feedback after implementation occurred.  Results:  Pilot evaluation on adult leukemia and bone marrow transplant (ALBMT) demonstrated that 87% of patients had an abnormal oral assessment, with 62% of patients having measurable oral mucosal changes. Nursing questionnaires showed that staff felt they were able to identify at risk patients using the oral assessment (3.3; 1-4 scale) and that the tool accurately identifies mucosal changes (2.9; 1-4 scale).  Hospital-wide roll out occurred in October 2007. In July 2008, a chart audit of the assessment tool demonstrated that documentation department-wide was 87%.  Documentation of the assessment was being done 100% of the time on pediatric and adult hematology-oncology and bone marrow transplant units. The assessment documentation rate was 88% for head and neck radiation outpatients. Other ambulatory areas have an opportunity for improving nursing assessment and documentation of oral mucositis and future audits are planned. Conclusion:  Oral mucositis is a distressing side effect of oncology treatment that needs to be accurately assessed and documented before moving on to prevention and early intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessment of Oral Mucositis in Adult and Pediatric Oncology Patients: An Evidence-Based Approachen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152040-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessment of Oral Mucositis in Adult and Pediatric Oncology Patients: An Evidence-Based Approach</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Farrington, Michele, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics/University of Iowa Children's Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Staff Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">michele-farrington@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Practice Session Presentation] Purpose:&nbsp; To improve evidence-based nursing assessment of oral mucositis. Methods:&nbsp; Patients describe oral mucositis as the most distressing side effect of cancer treatment (Jaroneski, 2006).&nbsp; Oral mucositis is problematic, resulting in delayed treatments, reduced treatment dosages, altered nutrition, dehydration, infections, xerostomia, pain, and increased healthcare costs (Brown &amp; Wingard, 2004; Sonis, et al., 2004).&nbsp; After reviewing the evidence and comparing tools, Eilers' Oral Assessment Guide was chosen for clinical use as the oral mucositis assessment tool for all oncology patients and was piloted in September 2006.&nbsp; The translational research model (Titler &amp; Everett, 2001) was used to guide implementation of the evidence-based changes which included:&nbsp; educating nursing and medical staff, outreach, developing a policy and procedure, modifying the computerized charting systems, and providing audit and feedback after implementation occurred.&nbsp; Results:&nbsp; Pilot evaluation on adult leukemia and bone marrow transplant (ALBMT) demonstrated that 87% of patients had an abnormal oral assessment, with 62% of patients having measurable oral mucosal changes. Nursing questionnaires showed that staff felt they were able to identify at risk patients using the oral assessment (3.3; 1-4 scale) and that the tool accurately identifies mucosal changes (2.9; 1-4 scale).&nbsp; Hospital-wide roll out occurred in October 2007. In July 2008, a chart audit of the assessment tool demonstrated that documentation department-wide was 87%.&nbsp; Documentation of the assessment was being done 100% of the time on pediatric and adult hematology-oncology and bone marrow transplant units. The assessment documentation rate was 88% for head and neck radiation outpatients. Other ambulatory areas have an opportunity for improving nursing assessment and documentation of oral mucositis and future audits are planned. Conclusion:&nbsp; Oral mucositis is a distressing side effect of oncology treatment that needs to be accurately assessed and documented before moving on to prevention and early intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:22:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:22:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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