Utilizing Evidence for Clinical Management of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152088
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Utilizing Evidence for Clinical Management of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections
Abstract:
Utilizing Evidence for Clinical Management of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Winstead, Yvette, MSN, MBA, MS, CRNP, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Thomas Jefferson University
Title:Clinical Instructor
[Evidence-based Practice Session Presentation] Purpose: The target audience includes nurses, nurse practitioners and physician assistants.  The purpose of this poster presentation is to describe the prevalence and clinical management of skin and soft tissue infections.     Background:  Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) caused by Staphylococcus aureus are among the most common infections encountered by emergency department physicians and nurse practitioners.  Until recently, clinical management of such infections consisted of incision and drainage and antibiotic therapy.  Of concern is the growing prevalence of community-associated methicillin resistant S. aureus as the cause of skin and soft tissue infections thus requiring a change in clinical evaluation and management.  In 2007 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued management guidelines but research indicates a wide variation in how clinicians manage patients.  Methods: This author conducted an evidentiary literature review to determine the prevalence of and the utilization of evidence for clinically managing SSTIs related to community-associated methicillin resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA). Results: A significant amount of research has been conducted about the prevalence and clinical management of SSTIs related to CA-MRSA.  The literature reviewed by this author indicated that the evidence is compelling regarding an increase in SSTIs related to CA-MRSA and that CA-MRSA is the most common isolate associated with SSTIs.  The prevalence and incidence of SSTIs caused by CA-MRSA has impacted all age groups, socio-economic backgrounds, and health conditions.  Furthermore, the literature reviewed by this author signified that there are variations among clinicians with regards to SSTIs management.  Conclusion: Based upon the literature reviewed this author has concluded that a large scale prospective study (randomized, controlled trial) is needed to determine the actual clinical management requirements for treating SSTIs related to CA-MRSA based upon geographical location and population base.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUtilizing Evidence for Clinical Management of Skin and Soft Tissue Infectionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152088-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Utilizing Evidence for Clinical Management of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Winstead, Yvette, MSN, MBA, MS, CRNP, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Thomas Jefferson University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yvette.winstead@jefferson.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Practice Session Presentation] Purpose: The target audience includes nurses, nurse practitioners and physician assistants. &nbsp;The purpose of this poster presentation is to describe the prevalence and clinical management of skin and soft tissue infections.&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; Background: &nbsp;Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) caused by Staphylococcus aureus are among the most common infections encountered by emergency department physicians and nurse practitioners. &nbsp;Until recently, clinical management of such infections consisted of incision and drainage and antibiotic therapy. &nbsp;Of concern is the growing prevalence of community-associated methicillin resistant S. aureus as the cause of skin and soft tissue infections thus requiring a change in clinical evaluation and management. &nbsp;In 2007 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued management guidelines but research indicates a wide variation in how clinicians manage patients.&nbsp; Methods: This author conducted an evidentiary literature review to determine the prevalence of and the utilization of evidence for clinically managing SSTIs related to community-associated methicillin resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA). Results: A significant amount of research has been conducted about the prevalence and clinical management of SSTIs related to CA-MRSA. &nbsp;The literature reviewed by this author indicated that the evidence is compelling regarding an increase in SSTIs related to CA-MRSA and that CA-MRSA is the most common isolate associated with SSTIs.&nbsp; The prevalence and incidence of SSTIs caused by CA-MRSA has impacted all age groups, socio-economic backgrounds, and health conditions.&nbsp; Furthermore, the literature reviewed by this author signified that there are variations among clinicians with regards to SSTIs management.&nbsp; Conclusion: Based upon the literature reviewed this author has concluded that a large scale prospective study (randomized, controlled trial) is needed to determine the actual clinical management requirements for treating SSTIs related to CA-MRSA based upon geographical location and population base.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:23:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:23:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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