2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152094
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Breastfeeding Duration between Two Groups of Mother-Infant Dyads
Abstract:
Breastfeeding Duration between Two Groups of Mother-Infant Dyads
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2010
Author:Brennan, Rita Allen, DNP, RNC-NIC, APN/CNS
P.I. Institution Name:Central DuPage Hospital
Title:Outcomes Manager
21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: The aim of the study was determine if there is a difference in breastfeeding duration between 2 groups of mother-infant dyads; those that supplemented breastfeeding and those that exclusively breastfed after birth. Study questions: 1.ÿWhat is the breastfeeding duration for both groups? 2. Is there a significant difference between the two groups in breastfeeding duration? 3. Why do mothers discontinue breastfeeding? 4.ÿWhat opportunities are there to support the breastfeeding mother? The working conceptual framework was derived from the World Health Organization which states that "breastfeeding is the normal way of providing infants with the nutrients they need" and that "Virtually all mothers can breastfeed, provided they have accurate information and the support of their family, the health care system and society at large." Methods: A longitudinal telephone survey was conducted at 6 weeks, 3, 6, and 12 months after birth.ÿ A convenience sample of 373 mothers agreed to participate; 176 were available for statistical analysis at the end of the 12 months. Results: Comparison of mean duration and differences between groups was determined. Mothers who did not supplement reported breastfeeding longer (p<0.002). Mothers who did not work outside the home were more likely to breastfeed for the 12 month period than discontinue breastfeeding (p<0.001). Additional analysis revealed that mothers who delivered vaginally breastfed their infant sooner after birth than those who delivered via cesarean section (p<.001).ÿ Conclusion: Breastfeeding has long-term health consequences for both the mother and infant. Nurses need to support the mother-infant dyad breastfeeding experience throughout the first year after birth. Healthcare providers must advocate for breastfeeding mothers in the workplace and in society.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBreastfeeding Duration between Two Groups of Mother-Infant Dyadsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152094-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Breastfeeding Duration between Two Groups of Mother-Infant Dyads</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brennan, Rita Allen, DNP, RNC-NIC, APN/CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Central DuPage Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Outcomes Manager</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rita_brennan@cdh.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: The aim of the study was determine if there is a difference in breastfeeding duration between 2 groups of mother-infant dyads; those that supplemented breastfeeding and those that exclusively breastfed after birth. Study questions: 1.&yuml;What is the breastfeeding duration for both groups? 2. Is there a significant difference between the two groups in breastfeeding duration? 3. Why do mothers discontinue breastfeeding? 4.&yuml;What opportunities are there to support the breastfeeding mother? The working conceptual framework was derived from the World Health Organization which states that &quot;breastfeeding is the normal way of providing infants with the nutrients they need&quot; and that &quot;Virtually all mothers can breastfeed, provided they have accurate information and the support of their family, the health care system and society at large.&quot; Methods: A longitudinal telephone survey was conducted at 6 weeks, 3, 6, and 12 months after birth.&yuml; A convenience sample of 373 mothers agreed to participate; 176 were available for statistical analysis at the end of the 12 months. Results: Comparison of mean duration and differences between groups was determined. Mothers who did not supplement reported breastfeeding longer (p&lt;0.002). Mothers who did not work outside the home were more likely to breastfeed for the 12 month period than discontinue breastfeeding (p&lt;0.001). Additional analysis revealed that mothers who delivered vaginally breastfed their infant sooner after birth than those who delivered via cesarean section (p&lt;.001).&yuml; Conclusion: Breastfeeding has long-term health consequences for both the mother and infant. Nurses need to support the mother-infant dyad breastfeeding experience throughout the first year after birth. Healthcare providers must advocate for breastfeeding mothers in the workplace and in society.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:23:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:23:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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