2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152108
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outcomes from a Test of Tribes Sharing Life
Abstract:
Outcomes from a Test of Tribes Sharing Life
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2010
Author:Fahrenwald, Nancy L., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:South Dakota State University
Title:Associate Dean for Research
21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: Among American Indians (AIs) there is a dire need for renal transplantation largely due to type 2 diabetes. Consent rates for deceased donation among AIs are low. The study purpose was to test a multi-state, culturally-targeted intervention to increase intent to serve as an organ/tissue donor among AI tribal college students. Methods: The study was derived from the Transtheoretical Model and based on the cultural traditions of story-telling and gift giving. A community-based participatory research approach and a 2-group quasi-experimental design were used. Six tribal colleges were matched by size then randomly assigned to two groups. The experimental program was classroom-based education (print, video and web-based materials). The control intervention was posted print materials promoting the web-site. AI adults attending tribal colleges (N=399) were included. Outcomes were (a) stage of motivational readiness to serve as an organ donor, and (b) self-report of enrollment in a state registry. Results: The classroom approach enrolled significantly more students than print materials only (p<.001). Of all who enrolled, there were no significant group differences in changes in either stage of motivational readiness to register as a donor or in registry enrollment by group (p>.05); 61% of all participants progressed in stage of readiness and 20% enrolled in a state registry. McNemar's test of significance for dependent samples was used to compare pre-and post-intervention stage of motivational readiness for all participants who were categorized as stage non-progressed (no change in stage of readiness, 39%), or stage progressed (progressed one or more stages of readiness, 61%). No participants regressed in stage. Progression in stage of readiness from pre- to post-intervention was significant, Chi squared (1) = 17.79, p <.05. Conclusion: Both interventions resulted in important changes in intention to serve as an organ/tissue donor for AI college students. Greater numbers were enrolled from the classroom approach.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOutcomes from a Test of Tribes Sharing Lifeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152108-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Outcomes from a Test of Tribes Sharing Life</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fahrenwald, Nancy L., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">South Dakota State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean for Research</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Nancy.Fahrenwald@sdstate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: Among American Indians (AIs) there is a dire need for renal transplantation largely due to type 2 diabetes. Consent rates for deceased donation among AIs are low. The study purpose was to test a multi-state, culturally-targeted intervention to increase intent to serve as an organ/tissue donor among AI tribal college students. Methods: The study was derived from the Transtheoretical Model and based on the cultural traditions of story-telling and gift giving. A community-based participatory research approach and a 2-group quasi-experimental design were used. Six tribal colleges were matched by size then randomly assigned to two groups. The experimental program was classroom-based education (print, video and web-based materials). The control intervention was posted print materials promoting the web-site. AI adults attending tribal colleges (N=399) were included. Outcomes were (a) stage of motivational readiness to serve as an organ donor, and (b) self-report of enrollment in a state registry. Results: The classroom approach enrolled significantly more students than print materials only (p&lt;.001). Of all who enrolled, there were no significant group differences in changes in either stage of motivational readiness to register as a donor or in registry enrollment by group (p&gt;.05); 61% of all participants progressed in stage of readiness and 20% enrolled in a state registry. McNemar's test of significance for dependent samples was used to compare pre-and post-intervention stage of motivational readiness for all participants who were categorized as stage non-progressed (no change in stage of readiness, 39%), or stage progressed (progressed one or more stages of readiness, 61%). No participants regressed in stage. Progression in stage of readiness from pre- to post-intervention was significant, Chi squared (1) = 17.79, p &lt;.05. Conclusion: Both interventions resulted in important changes in intention to serve as an organ/tissue donor for AI college students. Greater numbers were enrolled from the classroom approach.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:24:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:24:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.