Designing, Implementing, and Testing a Gender Specific HIV-Prevention Intervention for Adolescent Girls

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152140
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Designing, Implementing, and Testing a Gender Specific HIV-Prevention Intervention for Adolescent Girls
Abstract:
Designing, Implementing, and Testing a Gender Specific HIV-Prevention Intervention for Adolescent Girls
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Morrison-Beedy, Dianne, PhD, RN, WHNP, FNAP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Rochester
Title:Professor of Nursing
Co-Authors:Michael P. Carey, PhD
[Evidence-based Presentation] Background: Despite the ever-increasing impact HIV is having on adolescent girls worldwide, few gender specific interventions have been developed and scientifically tested. Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to describe the development, implementation, and testing of a community based HIV-prevention intervention for adolescent girls ages 15-19.Methods/Approach: Our interdisciplinary team developed, implemented, and tested aá small group intervention for vulnerable, economically-disadvantaged urban girls. This intervention was guided by the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model (IMB) using a multi-step approach. Specifically, formative work with the population was conducted using focus groups and content experts. Findings from the literature were integrated into these data and used to guide the development of an 8 hour manualized intervention. Divided into four 2-hour sessions, this intervention was then pilot tested using an iterative process to further refine it for full-scale testing in a randomized trial of 640 adolescent girls. Using common argot, colloquial language, and mannerisms familiar to adolescent girls with explicit, concrete terms/guidelines, we employed developmentally appropriate intervention strategies to provide repeated exposure to important constructs (i.e., information, motivation, behavioral skills). The intervention was designed to provide correct HIV-prevention information, increase motivation to change risky behaviors, and provide behavioral skills training. Two trained female facilitators teach sexual assertiveness and negotiating condom use and other safer sex practices, assist girls in identifying and navigating high-risk situations including the use of alcohol and drugs, and male and female condom application skills. We utilized a motivationally-enhanced approach to this intervention which incorporated gender and power issues relevant to these at-risk girls. Summary: With the overwhelming numbers of adolescent girls being infected with HIV, the need for interventions that both resonate with the adolescent girls for whom they are developed, are culturally appropriate, reproducible, and can endure the test of a scientifically-rigorous clinical trial is immense.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDesigning, Implementing, and Testing a Gender Specific HIV-Prevention Intervention for Adolescent Girlsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152140-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Designing, Implementing, and Testing a Gender Specific HIV-Prevention Intervention for Adolescent Girls</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Morrison-Beedy, Dianne, PhD, RN, WHNP, FNAP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Rochester</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Dianne_Morrison-Beedy@urmc.rochester.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michael P. Carey, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Presentation] Background: Despite the ever-increasing impact HIV is having on adolescent girls worldwide, few gender specific interventions have been developed and scientifically tested. Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to describe the development, implementation, and testing of a community based HIV-prevention intervention for adolescent girls ages 15-19.Methods/Approach: Our interdisciplinary team developed, implemented, and tested a&aacute; small group intervention for vulnerable, economically-disadvantaged urban girls. This intervention was guided by the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model (IMB) using a multi-step approach. Specifically, formative work with the population was conducted using focus groups and content experts. Findings from the literature were integrated into these data and used to guide the development of an 8 hour manualized intervention. Divided into four 2-hour sessions, this intervention was then pilot tested using an iterative process to further refine it for full-scale testing in a randomized trial of 640 adolescent girls. Using common argot, colloquial language, and mannerisms familiar to adolescent girls with explicit, concrete terms/guidelines, we employed developmentally appropriate intervention strategies to provide repeated exposure to important constructs (i.e., information, motivation, behavioral skills). The intervention was designed to provide correct HIV-prevention information, increase motivation to change risky behaviors, and provide behavioral skills training. Two trained female facilitators teach sexual assertiveness and negotiating condom use and other safer sex practices, assist girls in identifying and navigating high-risk situations including the use of alcohol and drugs, and male and female condom application skills. We utilized a motivationally-enhanced approach to this intervention which incorporated gender and power issues relevant to these at-risk girls. Summary: With the overwhelming numbers of adolescent girls being infected with HIV, the need for interventions that both resonate with the adolescent girls for whom they are developed, are culturally appropriate, reproducible, and can endure the test of a scientifically-rigorous clinical trial is immense.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:25:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:25:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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