Grounded Theory: The Impact of Cultural Stigma and Social Environment on Maintaining Mental Health among Jamaican Immigrants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152141
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Grounded Theory: The Impact of Cultural Stigma and Social Environment on Maintaining Mental Health among Jamaican Immigrants
Abstract:
Grounded Theory: The Impact of Cultural Stigma and Social Environment on Maintaining Mental Health among Jamaican Immigrants
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Mothersille-Payne, Jacqueline A., PhD, MSN, BSN, APRN-BC
P.I. Institution Name:American Nurses Association\SAMHSA
Title:Graduate -Minority Fellowship Program
[Evidence-based Presentation] There is a scarcity of literature pertaining to the mental health of the English speaking Caribbean immigrants, particularly Jamaican immigrants. Since Jamaicans are visually classified as African Americans, and English is their primary language, they are perceived as having similar attitudes, beliefs and health seeking behaviors as African Americans. A qualitative study was conducted to explore attitudes toward and beliefs about mental health and mental health seeking behaviors among Jamaican immigrants living in the United States. Thirty-five participants, 18 female and 17 male between 24-65 years of age were interviewed via a focused semi-structured interview guide. Analysis of the findings indicated that cultural stigma and social environment were the overarching factors that contributed to maintaining mental health of this immigrant group; along with the three dimensional complementary conceptual categories of mindset, reaction/response, and diversions/distracters. Being in control emerged as the basis social process (BSP) that reflects the Jamaican immigrant's ability to manage or ameliorate mental health issues. Based on the findings, the following conclusions were drawn: Jamaican immigrants are a distinct cultural group. Although Jamaican immigrants are visually classified as African American and may have some similar responses as other immigrant groups in terms of mental health, their process of dealing with mental health stressors/issues are unique. Globally, in order to reduce and eliminate ethnic and racial disparities pertaining to mental health, it is crucial for health professionals to establish an understanding of how the strengths of the cultural experience of various groups might be drawn upon to help understand or prevent the emergence of mental health problems or reduce the effects of mental illness if it occurs. For nurses to provide competent cross-cultural care they need to develop a understanding of how people of other cultures view and respond to health, illness, including mental illness and negotiate health care.á
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGrounded Theory: The Impact of Cultural Stigma and Social Environment on Maintaining Mental Health among Jamaican Immigrantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152141-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Grounded Theory: The Impact of Cultural Stigma and Social Environment on Maintaining Mental Health among Jamaican Immigrants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mothersille-Payne, Jacqueline A., PhD, MSN, BSN, APRN-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">American Nurses Association\SAMHSA</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate -Minority Fellowship Program</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jpayne@bowiestate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Presentation] There is a scarcity of literature pertaining to the mental health of the English speaking Caribbean immigrants, particularly Jamaican immigrants. Since Jamaicans are visually classified as African Americans, and English is their primary language, they are perceived as having similar attitudes, beliefs and health seeking behaviors as African Americans. A qualitative study was conducted to explore attitudes toward and beliefs about mental health and mental health seeking behaviors among Jamaican immigrants living in the United States. Thirty-five participants, 18 female and 17 male between 24-65 years of age were interviewed via a focused semi-structured interview guide. Analysis of the findings indicated that cultural stigma and social environment were the overarching factors that contributed to maintaining mental health of this immigrant group; along with the three dimensional complementary conceptual categories of mindset, reaction/response, and diversions/distracters. Being in control emerged as the basis social process (BSP) that reflects the Jamaican immigrant's ability to manage or ameliorate mental health issues. Based on the findings, the following conclusions were drawn: Jamaican immigrants are a distinct cultural group. Although Jamaican immigrants are visually classified as African American and may have some similar responses as other immigrant groups in terms of mental health, their process of dealing with mental health stressors/issues are unique. Globally, in order to reduce and eliminate ethnic and racial disparities pertaining to mental health, it is crucial for health professionals to establish an understanding of how the strengths of the cultural experience of various groups might be drawn upon to help understand or prevent the emergence of mental health problems or reduce the effects of mental illness if it occurs. For nurses to provide competent cross-cultural care they need to develop a understanding of how people of other cultures view and respond to health, illness, including mental illness and negotiate health care.&aacute;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:25:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:25:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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