The Effectiveness of Literature Search Skills Instruction Using Audience Response System Technology

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152142
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effectiveness of Literature Search Skills Instruction Using Audience Response System Technology
Abstract:
The Effectiveness of Literature Search Skills Instruction Using Audience Response System Technology
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Muzyka, Diann, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Clinical Associate Professor
[Symposium Presentation] To apply evidence-based practice in the clinical area nurses need to have a strong foundation in library search skills. After being introduced to evidence-based practice and how to write a PICOT (Population, Intervention, Comparison, Intervention, Time) question, students learn to gather evidence to answer the clinical question in collaboration with the health science librarian. In an effort to increase student interaction during both the research classes and the electronic search skills presentations, as well as to provide faculty with immediate, real-time feedback that reflects studentsÆ knowledge of presented information, the use of audience response software was used. Although students and faculty believed the audience response system had a positive impact on learning, literature review revealed minimal research in this area. Therefore, a pilot study to compare the acquisition of database search skills and the attitude of baccalaureate nursing students taught with an audience response system (ARS) to those taught by lecture only was conducted. A transdisciplinary team of nursing faculty and a librarian developed the research instruments. In addition to obtaining demographic information, a multiple choice pretest assessed baseline knowledge. Two multiple-choice post tests, one given after the initial presentation and the other given at the end of the semester, assessed the learners' acquisition of literature search skills. Students' attitudes about literature search skills were evaluated by a ten-question survey using a five-point Likert scale given at the end of the presentation and at the end of the semester. Pilot testing for the instruments occurred with this study. Instrument revisions will be incorporated into future studies. This presentation presents the differences and similarities in attitudes and skills retention between students participating in lectures through ARS technology and students who were exposed to traditional active learning and lecture techniques.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effectiveness of Literature Search Skills Instruction Using Audience Response System Technologyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152142-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effectiveness of Literature Search Skills Instruction Using Audience Response System Technology</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Muzyka, Diann, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">diann.muzyka@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Symposium Presentation] To apply evidence-based practice in the clinical area nurses need to have a strong foundation in library search skills. After being introduced to evidence-based practice and how to write a PICOT (Population, Intervention, Comparison, Intervention, Time) question, students learn to gather evidence to answer the clinical question in collaboration with the health science librarian. In an effort to increase student interaction during both the research classes and the electronic search skills presentations, as well as to provide faculty with immediate, real-time feedback that reflects students&AElig; knowledge of presented information, the use of audience response software was used. Although students and faculty believed the audience response system had a positive impact on learning, literature review revealed minimal research in this area. Therefore, a pilot study to compare the acquisition of database search skills and the attitude of baccalaureate nursing students taught with an audience response system (ARS) to those taught by lecture only was conducted. A transdisciplinary team of nursing faculty and a librarian developed the research instruments. In addition to obtaining demographic information, a multiple choice pretest assessed baseline knowledge. Two multiple-choice post tests, one given after the initial presentation and the other given at the end of the semester, assessed the learners' acquisition of literature search skills. Students' attitudes about literature search skills were evaluated by a ten-question survey using a five-point Likert scale given at the end of the presentation and at the end of the semester. Pilot testing for the instruments occurred with this study. Instrument revisions will be incorporated into future studies. This presentation presents the differences and similarities in attitudes and skills retention between students participating in lectures through ARS technology and students who were exposed to traditional active learning and lecture techniques.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:25:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:25:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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