Gender Differences in the Perceptions of an Ideal Career and Perceptions of Nursing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152155
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gender Differences in the Perceptions of an Ideal Career and Perceptions of Nursing
Abstract:
Gender Differences in the Perceptions of an Ideal Career and Perceptions of Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Rambur, Betty, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Vermont
Title:Dean
Co-Authors:Mary Val Palumbo, DNP, APRN; Judy Cohen, PhD and Barbara McIntosh, PhD
[Evidence-based Presentation] This survey design study sought to understand gender similarities and differences among young adults' perception of an ideal career and their perception of nursing.á A convenience sample of 71 females and 45 males ages 18-24 were recruited at job fairs and community events between January and September 2005. The setting was one US metropolitan statistical area within a rural, northeastern state and two more rural adjacent communities. The survey instrument, developed by May et al. and used with permission, measures 17 parallel items on a 5 point Likert scale. It has been assessed for reliability (coefficient alpha .81-.84) and content validity by a panel of experts. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, followed by paired t-tests with Bonferoni adjusted alpha significance at p < 0.0028.áMarked differences by gender emerged. Women perceived nursing as differing from their ideal career in the areas of "being appreciated" (nursing less than ideal), "work with hands" (nursing more than ideal), safe workplace (nursing less than ideal), and uses technology (nursing more than ideal).áConversely, for men the differences between an ideal career and nursing were not statistically significant in these areas. Instead, men saw nursing as less than the ideal in the area of "needs a college degree," a perception women did not share.áOverall, nursing was more consistent with an ideal career for men than women. Both men and women, however, saw nursing as busier than the ideal career, offering less decision-making, and fewer financial rewards.áImplications for evidence-base recruitment, workplace personnel strategies, and policy are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGender Differences in the Perceptions of an Ideal Career and Perceptions of Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152155-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gender Differences in the Perceptions of an Ideal Career and Perceptions of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rambur, Betty, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Vermont</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">betty.rambur@uvm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Val Palumbo, DNP, APRN; Judy Cohen, PhD and Barbara McIntosh, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Presentation] This survey design study sought to understand gender similarities and differences among young adults' perception of an ideal career and their perception of nursing.&aacute; A convenience sample of 71 females and 45 males ages 18-24 were recruited at job fairs and community events between January and September 2005. The setting was one US metropolitan statistical area within a rural, northeastern state and two more rural adjacent communities. The survey instrument, developed by May et al. and used with permission, measures 17 parallel items on a 5 point Likert scale. It has been assessed for reliability (coefficient alpha .81-.84) and content validity by a panel of experts. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, followed by paired t-tests with Bonferoni adjusted alpha significance at p &lt; 0.0028.&aacute;Marked differences by gender emerged. Women perceived nursing as differing from their ideal career in the areas of &quot;being appreciated&quot; (nursing less than ideal), &quot;work with hands&quot; (nursing more than ideal), safe workplace (nursing less than ideal), and uses technology (nursing more than ideal).&aacute;Conversely, for men the differences between an ideal career and nursing were not statistically significant in these areas. Instead, men saw nursing as less than the ideal in the area of &quot;needs a college degree,&quot; a perception women did not share.&aacute;Overall, nursing was more consistent with an ideal career for men than women. Both men and women, however, saw nursing as busier than the ideal career, offering less decision-making, and fewer financial rewards.&aacute;Implications for evidence-base recruitment, workplace personnel strategies, and policy are discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:25:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:25:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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