Building Information Proficiency Using Audience Response System Technology: Implications for Instruction in Evidence-Based Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152163
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building Information Proficiency Using Audience Response System Technology: Implications for Instruction in Evidence-Based Practice
Abstract:
Building Information Proficiency Using Audience Response System Technology: Implications for Instruction in Evidence-Based Practice
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Shell, Leslee, MSL
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Academic Librarian
[Symposium Presentation] An interdisciplinary team consisting of a nursing librarian and nursing faculty members introduced sequenced instruction in Evidence-Based Practice searching skills into the undergraduate nursing curriculum. Instructional sessions included hands-on practice with medical and nursing databases, practice in locating citations, practice in identifying search strategies for PICOT (Population, Intervention, Comparison, Intervention, Time) questions, and practice in finding citations that answer the PICOT question. Real world scenarios from students' clinical work are used in all searching examples. The librarian implemented ARS technology in a second instructional session and observed increased engagement in the session on the part of students. This observation prompted the team to question whether ARS technology was responsible for the observed engagement in the session. The team designed a study to observe differences in two lecture sections. One section used audience response technology (ARS) and the other section used the existing active learning techniques already in place to motivate and engage students. In designing prompts to maximize students' participation, the team consulted existing research on the pedagogy of ARS. In combination with ARS technology, we used peer discussions to stimulate discussion and address misconceptions. We also designed incentives to increase collaboration among students. ARS technology has implications for improving the effectiveness of library skills instruction when working with large groups of students and difficult instructional concepts.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding Information Proficiency Using Audience Response System Technology: Implications for Instruction in Evidence-Based Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152163-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Building Information Proficiency Using Audience Response System Technology: Implications for Instruction in Evidence-Based Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shell, Leslee, MSL</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Academic Librarian</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">leslee.shell@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Symposium Presentation] An interdisciplinary team consisting of a nursing librarian and nursing faculty members introduced sequenced instruction in Evidence-Based Practice searching skills into the undergraduate nursing curriculum. Instructional sessions included hands-on practice with medical and nursing databases, practice in locating citations, practice in identifying search strategies for PICOT (Population, Intervention, Comparison, Intervention, Time) questions, and practice in finding citations that answer the PICOT question. Real world scenarios from students' clinical work are used in all searching examples. The librarian implemented ARS technology in a second instructional session and observed increased engagement in the session on the part of students. This observation prompted the team to question whether ARS technology was responsible for the observed engagement in the session. The team designed a study to observe differences in two lecture sections. One section used audience response technology (ARS) and the other section used the existing active learning techniques already in place to motivate and engage students. In designing prompts to maximize students' participation, the team consulted existing research on the pedagogy of ARS. In combination with ARS technology, we used peer discussions to stimulate discussion and address misconceptions. We also designed incentives to increase collaboration among students. ARS technology has implications for improving the effectiveness of library skills instruction when working with large groups of students and difficult instructional concepts.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:26:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:26:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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