Suicide and self-harm intent: Evidence for re-conceptualization from a clinical study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152165
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Suicide and self-harm intent: Evidence for re-conceptualization from a clinical study
Abstract:
Suicide and self-harm intent: Evidence for re-conceptualization from a clinical study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Sta Mina, Elaine, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Ryerson University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Paul Links, MD, FRCPC
[Evidence-based Presentation] Suicide and self-harm behavior are a global concern and a priority for the World Health Organization (2000). Health care clinicians assess the extent of the wish-to-die in patients who engage in suicidal behavior and plan evidence based interventions. Yet, the assessment is challenging and often uncertain. The theoretical literature has not resolved whether suicide and self-harm are different or the same phenomenon (Walsh & Rosen,1998); nor have intervention reviews demonstrated empirical evidence of efficacy (Hawton et al., 1998). Is the patient engaging in non-suicidal, self-harm behavior or attempting to terminate his or her life? Historically, international researchers and clinicians, across professions, have conceptualized the constellation of self-injurious behaviors from the perspective of the extreme event: death (Fuse, 1997). Recently, trauma theorists articulate contrasting theories that purport an event which sustains life (Herman, 1992). In a clinical, trans-disciplinary study, a series of questionnaires, which measure intent based upon the major concepts from the suicide and self-harm literature, were given to 83 patients in an emergency population who engaged in self-harm/ suicidal behavior. Their mean scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (Beck, Steer & Garbin, 1988), the Beck Hopelessness Scale (Beck, Weissman, Lester & Trexler, 1974) the Beck Suicide Intent Scale (Beck, Weissman, Lester & Trexler, 1976), and the Self-Injury Questionnaire (Alexander, 1999) suggest that numerous reasons: affect regulation, dissociation management, coping and the wish to die, coalesce rather than diverge. The analysis of the data supports the re-conceptualization of self-injurious and suicidal behavior. This paper presents an alternative, comprehensive conceptualization of intention in self-harm behavior. A complex, multifaceted phenomenon arises from the data which challenges the traditional spotlight on the intent-to-die and requires assessments that are holistic, and simultaneously inclusive of strategies to stay alive. Implications for evidence based interventions and future research are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSuicide and self-harm intent: Evidence for re-conceptualization from a clinical studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152165-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Suicide and self-harm intent: Evidence for re-conceptualization from a clinical study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sta Mina, Elaine, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ryerson University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">esantami@ryerson.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Paul Links, MD, FRCPC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Presentation] Suicide and self-harm behavior are a global concern and a priority for the World Health Organization (2000). Health care clinicians assess the extent of the wish-to-die in patients who engage in suicidal behavior and plan evidence based interventions. Yet, the assessment is challenging and often uncertain. The theoretical literature has not resolved whether suicide and self-harm are different or the same phenomenon (Walsh &amp; Rosen,1998); nor have intervention reviews demonstrated empirical evidence of efficacy (Hawton et al., 1998). Is the patient engaging in non-suicidal, self-harm behavior or attempting to terminate his or her life? Historically, international researchers and clinicians, across professions, have conceptualized the constellation of self-injurious behaviors from the perspective of the extreme event: death (Fuse, 1997). Recently, trauma theorists articulate contrasting theories that purport an event which sustains life (Herman, 1992). In a clinical, trans-disciplinary study, a series of questionnaires, which measure intent based upon the major concepts from the suicide and self-harm literature, were given to 83 patients in an emergency population who engaged in self-harm/ suicidal behavior. Their mean scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (Beck, Steer &amp; Garbin, 1988), the Beck Hopelessness Scale (Beck, Weissman, Lester &amp; Trexler, 1974) the Beck Suicide Intent Scale (Beck, Weissman, Lester &amp; Trexler, 1976), and the Self-Injury Questionnaire (Alexander, 1999) suggest that numerous reasons: affect regulation, dissociation management, coping and the wish to die, coalesce rather than diverge. The analysis of the data supports the re-conceptualization of self-injurious and suicidal behavior. This paper presents an alternative, comprehensive conceptualization of intention in self-harm behavior. A complex, multifaceted phenomenon arises from the data which challenges the traditional spotlight on the intent-to-die and requires assessments that are holistic, and simultaneously inclusive of strategies to stay alive. Implications for evidence based interventions and future research are discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:26:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:26:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.