Enhancing Global Dialogue in Sociocultural, Political, Economic and Health Determinants in SARA

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152193
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Enhancing Global Dialogue in Sociocultural, Political, Economic and Health Determinants in SARA
Abstract:
Enhancing Global Dialogue in Sociocultural, Political, Economic and Health Determinants in SARA
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2008
Author:Constantino, Rose E., PhD, JD, RN, BSN, MN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Faustino, Jerome G. Babate, RN, MBA; Patricia A. Crane, PhD, MSN, RNC, WHNP; Ayman Hamdan-Mansour, PhD, MSc, RN; Kawkab Shishani, PhD, MSN, BSN; Honorable Tricia R. Hunter, RN, MN
[Research Symposium] The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate with case examples that sociocultural political, economic, and health determine the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of HELP. Various definitions of SARA in the US, Jordan, and the Philippines exist while multiple intersecting factors impact SARA care globally. Within each country, vast variations, attitudes and opinions regarding SARA crimes and suffering evolve. Often, recognition of differences within and among culturally defined populations is lacking. Other factors that may influence care include attitudes towards the human body, attitudes towards sex, gender, marriage and family, level of understanding and acceptance of the sexual activities and practices of other cultures, individual survival, and attitudes towards victims of crime and criminals. SARA, HELP, and cultural competence will be defined. The World Health Organization's ecological model in tandem with the collaborative partnership synergy model will be explained. The usefulness of these models in enhancing SARA care their families and communities and villages is explained from a cultural competence and synergy perspective. Understanding the roots of SARA from personal, to family and community factors, social relationships, norms and behaviors, and influence of society at large that affect the sanctions or protections against SARA perpetrators is crucial. The three levels of prevention in SARA care: primary level-before SARA occurs, secondary level-emergent and immediate treatment, and tertiary level-follow-care and long-term care will be addressed. HELP will be integrated as a holistic approach to improved care of survivors of SARA among countries. Examination of prejudices and attitudes among a diverse transdisciplinary care providers that convey respect for the values, beliefs, and customs is important. Culturally and technologically competent diverse transdisciplinary partners may offer ample opportunity to institute individual and institutional change globally and promote the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of HELP outcomes while respecting human rights from a global perspective.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnhancing Global Dialogue in Sociocultural, Political, Economic and Health Determinants in SARAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152193-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Enhancing Global Dialogue in Sociocultural, Political, Economic and Health Determinants in SARA</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Constantino, Rose E., PhD, JD, RN, BSN, MN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rco100@pitt.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Faustino, Jerome G. Babate, RN, MBA; Patricia A. Crane, PhD, MSN, RNC, WHNP; Ayman Hamdan-Mansour, PhD, MSc, RN; Kawkab Shishani, PhD, MSN, BSN; Honorable Tricia R. Hunter, RN, MN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Symposium] The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate with case examples that sociocultural political, economic, and health determine the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of HELP. Various definitions of SARA in the US, Jordan, and the Philippines exist while multiple intersecting factors impact SARA care globally. Within each country, vast variations, attitudes and opinions regarding SARA crimes and suffering evolve. Often, recognition of differences within and among culturally defined populations is lacking. Other factors that may influence care include attitudes towards the human body, attitudes towards sex, gender, marriage and family, level of understanding and acceptance of the sexual activities and practices of other cultures, individual survival, and attitudes towards victims of crime and criminals. SARA, HELP, and cultural competence will be defined. The World Health Organization's ecological model in tandem with the collaborative partnership synergy model will be explained. The usefulness of these models in enhancing SARA care their families and communities and villages is explained from a cultural competence and synergy perspective. Understanding the roots of SARA from personal, to family and community factors, social relationships, norms and behaviors, and influence of society at large that affect the sanctions or protections against SARA perpetrators is crucial. The three levels of prevention in SARA care: primary level-before SARA occurs, secondary level-emergent and immediate treatment, and tertiary level-follow-care and long-term care will be addressed. HELP will be integrated as a holistic approach to improved care of survivors of SARA among countries. Examination of prejudices and attitudes among a diverse transdisciplinary care providers that convey respect for the values, beliefs, and customs is important. Culturally and technologically competent diverse transdisciplinary partners may offer ample opportunity to institute individual and institutional change globally and promote the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of HELP outcomes while respecting human rights from a global perspective.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:27:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:27:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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