Women with Cardiac Symptoms Seeking Treatment in the Emergency Department: A Grounded Theory Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152283
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women with Cardiac Symptoms Seeking Treatment in the Emergency Department: A Grounded Theory Study
Abstract:
Women with Cardiac Symptoms Seeking Treatment in the Emergency Department: A Grounded Theory Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Turris, Sheila A., RN, BHSc, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:British Columbia Institute of Technology
Title:Faculty
Cardiac disease is the number one killer of North American women. We know that female gender and cardiac disease intersect. Further, we know that women and men have differing experiences within the health care system. Although Emergency Departments (ED) are a point of first contact for women with signs and symptoms suggestive of cardiac illness, this setting has seldom been studied. In particular, little attention has been directed toward understanding the experiences of women seeking treatment in EDs. Experiences of ED care may be an important determinant of the duration of treatment seeking delay in the context of symptoms indicative of cardiac illness. In this grounded theory study, I collected data from more than 100 hours of participant observation and 20, semi-structured interviews with a convenience sample of women who sought care for cardiac symptoms in one of 2 urban EDs between June of 2005 and June of 2006. The results of this study are reported in this poster presentation. The emerging findings suggest that decision making about treatment seeking is a complex phenomenon that involves a plethora of small decisions, rather than a single decision point. As well, data reveal that these decisions are to some extent gendered. One particularly interesting finding of this study is that participants made decisions about seeking treatment not based solely on an assessment of symptoms or possible outcomes, but on the meaning of those symptoms within the larger context of their lives. Women making decisions about seeking treatment respond to symptoms using a variety of lens including rational, relational, temporal and embodied. Finally, the emerging findings confirm that women have particular ideas about what constitutes quality care in the ED.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen with Cardiac Symptoms Seeking Treatment in the Emergency Department: A Grounded Theory Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152283-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women with Cardiac Symptoms Seeking Treatment in the Emergency Department: A Grounded Theory Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Turris, Sheila A., RN, BHSc, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">British Columbia Institute of Technology</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Faculty</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Sheila_Turris@bcit.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Cardiac disease is the number one killer of North American women. We know that female gender and cardiac disease intersect. Further, we know that women and men have differing experiences within the health care system. Although Emergency Departments (ED) are a point of first contact for women with signs and symptoms suggestive of cardiac illness, this setting has seldom been studied. In particular, little attention has been directed toward understanding the experiences of women seeking treatment in EDs. Experiences of ED care may be an important determinant of the duration of treatment seeking delay in the context of symptoms indicative of cardiac illness.&nbsp;In this grounded theory study, I collected data from more than 100 hours of participant observation and 20, semi-structured interviews with a convenience sample of women who sought care for cardiac symptoms in one of 2 urban EDs between June of 2005 and June of 2006. The results of this study are reported in this poster presentation. The emerging findings suggest that decision making about treatment seeking is a complex phenomenon that involves a plethora of small decisions, rather than a single decision point. As well, data reveal that these decisions are to some extent gendered. One particularly interesting finding of this study is that participants made decisions about seeking treatment not based solely on an assessment of symptoms or possible outcomes, but on the meaning of those symptoms within the larger context of their lives. Women making decisions about seeking treatment respond to symptoms using a variety of lens including rational, relational, temporal and embodied. Finally, the emerging findings confirm that women have particular ideas about what constitutes quality care in the ED.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:30:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:30:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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