Taking Action to Reduce Chlamydia: Generating Local Knowledge to Guide our Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152292
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Taking Action to Reduce Chlamydia: Generating Local Knowledge to Guide our Practice
Abstract:
Taking Action to Reduce Chlamydia: Generating Local Knowledge to Guide our Practice
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Wong, Josephine Pui-Hing, RN, MScN
P.I. Institution Name:Toronto Public Health
Title:Health Promotion Consultant
Co-Authors:Renee Boi-Doku, PHN, BScN; Karen B.K. Chan, BA; Simone McWatt, BA
Chlamydia is the most prevalent sexually transmitted infection (STI) in Canada.  It disproportionately affects young women.  Whereas the 2002 overall rates of chlamydia in Canada were 179.3/100,000, the chlamydia rates for females aged 15-24 were 1421.8/100,000.  It is estimated that 80% of women and 50% of men infected with chlamydia are asymptomatic; when left untreated, many develop pelvic inflammatory diseases, infertility and other complications.  In 2004, Toronto Public Health (TPH) established the use of health communication campaigns as one of the key strategies to reduce chlamydia rates among women aged 15-24.  Mapping of local epidemiological data identified 20 ?priority? neighbourhoods where the prevalence of chlamydia was disproportionately higher than other neighbourhoods.  As evidence suggests that effective health promotion campaigns must be relevant to the ?target? populations, TPH undertook a study to generate local knowledge on the experiences of young women in these priority neighbourhoods in using sexual health care, their perceptions of chlamydia testing and their opinions of an effective health communication campaign.   A total of 49 sexually active young women aged 16-19 and 20-24 were recruited to participate in 5 focus groups.  A pre-discussion survey was used to allow anonymous responses to questions of a sensitive nature.  Findings of the study show that most participants had multiple misconceptions about chlamydia and testing; many participants also reported a lack of relevant sex education at school, at home or in the community.  They identified access to non-judgmental, confidential and comprehensive ?one-stop? sexual health services as the key to encourage chlamydia testing among young women.  In terms of health communication campaigns, opinions of the participants reflected tension and contradictions that illustrate the day-to-day challenges that young women are faced with in embracing their sexuality.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTaking Action to Reduce Chlamydia: Generating Local Knowledge to Guide our Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152292-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Taking Action to Reduce Chlamydia: Generating Local Knowledge to Guide our Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wong, Josephine Pui-Hing, RN, MScN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Toronto Public Health</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Health Promotion Consultant</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jwong1@toronto.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Renee Boi-Doku, PHN, BScN; Karen B.K. Chan, BA; Simone McWatt, BA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Chlamydia is the most prevalent sexually transmitted infection (STI) in Canada.&nbsp; It disproportionately affects young women.&nbsp; Whereas the 2002 overall rates of chlamydia in Canada were 179.3/100,000, the chlamydia rates for females aged 15-24 were 1421.8/100,000.&nbsp; It is estimated that 80% of women and 50% of men infected with chlamydia are asymptomatic; when left untreated, many develop pelvic inflammatory diseases, infertility and other complications.&nbsp; In 2004, Toronto Public Health (TPH) established the use of health communication campaigns as one of the key strategies to reduce chlamydia rates among women aged 15-24. &nbsp;Mapping of local epidemiological data identified 20 ?priority? neighbourhoods where the prevalence of chlamydia was disproportionately higher than other neighbourhoods.&nbsp; As evidence suggests that effective health promotion campaigns must be relevant to the ?target? populations, TPH undertook a study to generate local knowledge on the experiences of young women in these priority neighbourhoods in using sexual health care, their perceptions of chlamydia testing and their opinions of an effective health communication campaign. &nbsp; A total of 49 sexually active young women aged 16-19 and 20-24 were recruited to participate in 5 focus groups.&nbsp; A pre-discussion survey was used to allow anonymous responses to questions of a sensitive nature.&nbsp; Findings of the study show that most participants had multiple misconceptions about chlamydia and testing; many participants also reported a lack of relevant sex education at school, at home or in the community.&nbsp; They identified access to non-judgmental, confidential and comprehensive ?one-stop? sexual health services as the key to encourage chlamydia testing among young women.&nbsp; In terms of health communication campaigns, opinions of the participants reflected tension and contradictions that illustrate the day-to-day challenges that young women are faced with in embracing their sexuality.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:30:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:30:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.