Successes and Challenges in Communicating with Participants in an RN Residency Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/152294
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Successes and Challenges in Communicating with Participants in an RN Residency Program
Abstract:
Successes and Challenges in Communicating with Participants in an RN Residency Program
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Wysocki, Lucy, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California Davis Medical Center
Title:RN Residency Program Coordinator/Clinical Nurse III
Co-Authors:Bonnie Raingruber, RN, PhD; James Hill, RN, BSN; Peter Rutan, RN; Carol Robinson, RN, MS, FAAN; Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin, PhD; Kate Shade, RN, MSN; Mary Braham, RN, PhD; Denise Wall, RN, MSN; Robin Kennedy, PhD; Susan Eggman-Talamantes, MSW, PhD
Objectives: (1) To evaluate communication methods which have been successful in an RN Residency Program, in maintaining sustained program involvement. (2) To identify the challenges involved in communicating with participants. Setting, Design, and Method: Research was conducted at a 500-bed, level I trauma, university teaching, acute care hospital in Northern California. The study focused on 250 participants, half of which were new graduate nurses (mentees), and the rest were experienced nurses (mentors). Concept Targeted: New graduate nurses were matched with experienced nurses who served as mentors for a 12 month period. The expectation was that new nurses? clinical competency and job satisfaction would increase as a result of the program. Various communication methods were used to disseminate information relevant to the program. Periodic communication also served to motivate mentees to attend group meetings, communicate with their mentors, and complete activities involving a patient simulator. Communication methods included personal contact, group meetings, email, unit based informational notebooks, unit based representatives, voice activated communication, manager updates, and journals. Findings: A variance existed in participants? responses to various communication methods used. Mentors responded more quickly to communication via email. Reasons given by mentees for not responding more quickly to communications included: they didn?t realize how important certain activities were; they didn?t know how to log on to their email accounts; scheduling conflicts and other unit based activities interfered with their attendance at group meetings. Conclusion: Researchers found that multiple communication methods were necessary to elicit responses from participants, and that reinforcement of information via several communication methods were often needed. Implications: Researchers may need to find creative and alternative methods of communication when implementing an RN Residency Program at a large teaching hospital.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSuccesses and Challenges in Communicating with Participants in an RN Residency Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/152294-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Successes and Challenges in Communicating with Participants in an RN Residency Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wysocki, Lucy, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California Davis Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">RN Residency Program Coordinator/Clinical Nurse III</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lucy.wysocki@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bonnie Raingruber, RN, PhD; James Hill, RN, BSN; Peter Rutan, RN; Carol Robinson, RN, MS, FAAN; Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin, PhD; Kate Shade, RN, MSN; Mary Braham, RN, PhD; Denise Wall, RN, MSN; Robin Kennedy, PhD; Susan Eggman-Talamantes, MSW, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: (1) To evaluate communication methods which have been successful in an RN Residency Program, in maintaining sustained program involvement. (2) To identify the challenges involved in communicating with participants. Setting, Design, and Method: Research was conducted at a 500-bed, level I trauma, university teaching, acute care hospital in Northern California. The study focused on 250 participants, half of which were new graduate nurses (mentees), and the rest were experienced nurses (mentors). Concept Targeted: New graduate nurses were matched with experienced nurses who served as mentors for a 12 month period. The expectation was that new nurses? clinical competency and job satisfaction would increase as a result of the program. Various communication methods were used to disseminate information relevant to the program. Periodic communication also served to motivate mentees to attend group meetings, communicate with their mentors, and complete activities involving a patient simulator. Communication methods included personal contact, group meetings, email, unit based informational notebooks, unit based representatives, voice activated communication, manager updates, and journals. Findings: A variance existed in participants? responses to various communication methods used. Mentors responded more quickly to communication via email. Reasons given by mentees for not responding more quickly to communications included: they didn?t realize how important certain activities were; they didn?t know how to log on to their email accounts; scheduling conflicts and other unit based activities interfered with their attendance at group meetings. Conclusion: Researchers found that multiple communication methods were necessary to elicit responses from participants, and that reinforcement of information via several communication methods were often needed. Implications: Researchers may need to find creative and alternative methods of communication when implementing an RN Residency Program at a large teaching hospital.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T11:30:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T11:30:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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